Irish Recipes, Irish Traditions

Authentic Irish Coffee Recipe and History

On the day of Saint Patrick’s Day, the remark that “everyone is Irish” is one that has been heard rather often. We are aware that this is the case, and we also are aware that it is simple to partake in the good fortune of the Irish by first partaking in a delectable dinner and then in a traditional Irish coffee.

An Irish Coffee is a wonderfully sinful treat during the cooler weather. Coffee drinks are one of the most decadent wintertime essentials that come to mind for us right now. They provide a double dose of caffeine and alcohol to the system all at once, making them ideal for either the beginning or the conclusion of a night out on the town. One of the most traditional coffee-based mixed beverages is called Irish coffee. It is the best possible mix of whipped cream, Irish whiskey, and sweetened coffee, of course. It is comforting, delicious, and surprisingly simple to prepare.

Do I really need to heat up my mug?

It is customary to prepare Irish coffee in a glass cup. To prevent the mug from shattering when the hot coffee is poured inside, the glass should be preheated with hot water first, and then a metal spoon should be left within while the coffee is being poured. If you are drinking your coffee out of a ceramic mug, you generally don’t need to be concerned about this at all. However, warming your cup can eliminate the cold and help your drink remain warm for a longer period of time, thus it is something that we strongly suggest doing.

IRISH COFFEE INGREDIENTS

  • 16 oz. hot water
  • 2 tsp. light brown sugar
  • 1 c. freshly brewed coffee
  • 2 oz. Irish whiskey (such as Jameson)
  • 1/2 c. heavy cream for topping
  • Top with a few Irish Chocolate shavings, for a luxurious garnish!

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING AN IRISH COFFEE

  1. Fill 2 mugs with hot water and let sit 2 minutes. Pour out the water and add 1 teaspoon of light brown sugar to each mug. Pour over hot coffee and stir to dissolve sugar, then pour in whiskey.
  2. In a separate bowl with an electric mixer or by hand, whisk the cream until soft peaks form. The cream should be thick but still pourable. Top coffee with cream by gently pouring it over the back of a warm spoon to form a thick layer on top of the coffee. Garnish with chocolate shavings.

The History of the Irish Coffee Origins

Joe Sheridan, a cook working at Foynes Port in Ireland close to Limerick, came up with the recipe for Irish Coffee during the winter of 1943. During World War II, Foynes was converted into one of the largest civilian airports in Europe, and after the war, it was used as an airfield for transatlantic flights that often transported prominent politicians and Hollywood actors. The airfield was often used as a rest stop for longer flights in order to refuel, and passengers would frequently be required to remain the night owing to inclement weather. A new restaurant was constructed specifically to cater to the needs of these distinguished travelers.

One evening, an aircraft that was halfway through its route was forced to make a U-turn and return to Foynes Air Base. Because the passengers had been kept waiting, they were shivering, and they were exhausted, so Joe Sheridan, the head chef, decided to make something special for them to drink. The tale says that there was complete stillness in the room as each person savored this mouthwatering delicacy.

How did Irish Coffee get its name?

The following conversation is said to have given rise to the name, according to the legend: An American traveler was taken aback and asked another, “Hey Buddy,” “is this Brazilian coffee?” Joe said, “No, that’s not an Irish coffee.”

The Irish Coffee was a big hit and eventually became a popular specialty in airports. A travel journalist by the name of Stanton Delaplane brought Irish Coffee to the United States in the year 1952, just after the end of the war. He told Jack Koeppler, a bartender at the Buena Vista Hotel in San Francisco, about it and convinced him to make another one of the drinks.

Original Irish Coffee recipe offered by Joe Sheridan, to make a true Irish Coffee:

Cream – Rich as an Irish Brogue
Coffee – Strong as a Friendly Hand
Sugar – Sweet as the tongue of a Rogue
Whiskey – Smooth as the Wit of the Land

Because it is easy to drink, all you need to do is relax and take pleasure in it.

Be sure to toast your Irish coffee with a hearty “Sláinte!” (pronounced slawn-CHA). It means “Health!” and is the Irish equivalent to “Cheers!”

Ireland, Irish Recipes, Irish Traditions

What Makes Up a Full Irish Breakfast?

There is nothing like starting your day off with a traditional Irish Breakfast, especially on vacation. Have you ever been curious about how to cook breakfast in the Irish style? You don’t need to search any further! It is quite easy to do, and it is a beautiful way to show appreciation to your loved ones!

Irish Breakfast History

The traditional Irish breakfast was developed for agricultural laborers so that they may begin their days feeling satisfied and ready to put in a long day’s work. The lunch consisted of handmade goods as well as locally sourced ingredients, all of which were prepared in a frying pan with a pat of Irish butter.

What Are the Components of a Full Irish Breakfast?

full Irish breakfast is a name given to the customary cooked meal that is served in Ireland. However, the word “full Irish breakfast” may have a variety of distinct meanings depending on who you ask and where you reside. (In Ulster, which is located in Northern Ireland, the breakfast dish is sometimes referred to as an “Ulster fry.”)

To be considered a complete Irish breakfast, a meal must have any or all the following components: bacon, sausages, baked beans, eggs, grilled mushrooms, and tomatoes, and sometimes some leftover fried potatoes prepared as hash or bubble & squeak. In addition, there will be toast with butter and marmalade, as well as a lot of tea to drink.

Ingredients for an Irish Breakfast (Per Person):

2 Irish Style Sausages
2 Irish Style Rashers also known as Bacon
2 pieces of Irish Style Black Pudding (cut to approximately 2cm thick)
2 pieces of Irish Style White Pudding (cut to approximately 2cm thick)
1 Egg
1/2 Tomato  

1 cup of Grilled mushrooms
Batchelors Baked Beans (The preferred Irish favorite)

How to prepare a Full Irish Breakfast:

1. Turn your grill on to full heat.
2. Keep your plates underneath the grill to start them warming through.
3. Place your sausages on the grill.
4. Keep turning your sausages until fully golden and cooked through.
5. Place your rashers on the grill.  It is best to place them all facing the same direction with the rind of the rasher is showing. This will allow the heat from the grill above to crisp the rind of the rasher without drying out the meat.
6. Place the slices of Black and White pudding on the grill and cook until warmed through and golden on each side.
7. Empty the contents of a can of beans into a small saucepan and place on low heat.
8. Fry the egg in a non-stick frying pan over medium heat with a little oil.
9. Half the tomatoes and season with a little salt and pepper, sprinkle with a pinch of sugar and add a tiny knob of butter, pop them under a grill or in a hot oven until they are well cooked.

Then toast the bread, spread it with Irish butter, and serve with a good old Irish tea like Barry’s tea. Enjoy!

When is a Full Irish Eaten Typically?

It is customary to offer a complete Irish breakfast in the morning, but this dish may also be enjoyed at other times of the day and even often takes the place of lunch. Rarely is it offered every day of the week; rather, it is kept for the weekend to be enjoyed on a leisurely Saturday or Sunday, or when on vacation at hotels and bed & breakfasts where the stay is not complete without having one.

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 12 Important Celtic Symbols and Meanings

Related Posts

  1. Traditional Irish Shepherd’s Pie Recipe
  2. Barmbrack Recipe
  3. Irish Soda Bread Recipe & History
Interesting Stories, Irish Recipes, Irish Traditions, Travel Ireland

How to Pour and Drink a Pint of Guinness

Pouring a pint of Guinness is an art form. Despite appearances, a pint of Guinness is not easy to pour and consume. Every time you pour a pint of Guinness, you follow a certain ritual that you learned from your grandfather. If you don’t go about it in the correct way, not only will others look down on you, but your pint will be subpar as well.

How to Pour a Perfect Pint of Guinness

When it comes to pouring a perfect pint of Guinness, there is a tried and true procedure that has been authorized by the brewery. And then there’s the somewhat different approach used by bartenders in Ireland. There is also a standard, speedy way of pouring a regular beer that is utilized by most bartenders worldwide; some of them even serve Guinness without the traditional “2 part pour,” which is shocking to many beer purists.

  1. Pouring a pint of Guinness into an authentic Guinness branded glass should take 125.27 seconds and the glass should be used just for pouring Guinness.
  2. The glass should be tilted at a 45-degree angle with respect to the tap’s spout, which should be kept near to but not in contact with the glass.
  3. Each Guinness glass has a harp design at the base, and the liquid level should reach that mark when the pour begins. Without hesitating, the tap must be pushed straight down.
  4. The glass should be filled to the top edge of the harp symbol, or three-quarters to the top of the glass itself, with a little straightening of the glass when pouring.
  5. The pint has to be allowed to settle, which is the most important step. Brownish in hue, the liquid will have the appearance of clouds churning and ebbing inside it.
  6. After a minute or two, this will settle and darken completely. If you want your glass to be perfectly full, you should fill it by carefully pushing the tap in the other way. This is what makes the foamy top. If there is any foam that has to be removed from the top to prevent spilling, you will need to begin the process all over again.

A guide to enjoying a Pint of Guinness.

The act of consuming a Guinness is just as ritualistic as the act of pouring it. The first rule of drinking a pint that has been poured in two stages is that you should wait until the bartender has set it down before you take a sip.

It’s likely that the cloudiness returned when you were pouring the head, so you’ll want to let it settle once again. You should wait until the white and black lines have separated before taking a drink. That initial gulp should be substantial enough to get you past all that froth and into the rich black liquid underneath. This will keep the initial flavor from becoming very bitter.

If you want to leave around five or six rings of foam around the edge of your glass, you should drink the remainder of your pint in similarly large gulps. Finally, have fun with it!

An Overview of the Origins of the Guinness Two-Part Pour

The origin of the Guinness 2 part pour technique may be traced back to the 1930s when it was developed as a solution to an issue. There were both well-conditioned and poorly conditioned barrels of Guinness beer, with the latter being more mature and vivacious. Bartenders back then had to use beer from the low cask to fill a glass halfway before adding more beer from the high cask. Every bartender seems to have their own method for this very complicated procedure.

Guinness sought out Michael Ash, a mathematician-turned-brewer, in 1951 to help stimulate creative thinking. Gaseous nitrogen, which makes up about 75 percent of the air we breathe, was the clear choice for Ash because, as he put it, “it’s entirely inert.” That worked well for what I needed it for. In 1959, in honor of the brewery’s 200th anniversary, Nitro Guinness Stout was introduced after extensive trials and keg testing.

What is the official beer of St Patrick’s day?

Guinness is most likely the first drink that springs to mind when thinking of the most traditional beverages associated with Saint Patrick’s Day. Drinking an Irish beer really does seem like it should be a must around the holidays.

Toasting Your Pint of Guinness

Guinness themselves show off one of the most popular, honoring the rituals surrounding the perfect pint and ceremoniously greeting good health with the Irish term “Sláinte.” [Celebrating the traditions surrounding the perfect pint]
So raise a glass of Ireland’s most renowned brew, Guinness, and offer a toast to your health while using the Irish term “sláinte,” which literally translates to “cheers.”

Translating to “good health” in English, sláinte [try saying slawn-tche] is an Irish expression that derives from the word “slán,” meaning “healthy” or “safe”.

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Halloween, Irish Recipes, Irish Traditions

Barmbrack Recipe

Barmbrack is the center of an Irish Halloween or Samhain custom. The Halloween Brack traditionally contained various objects baked into the bread and was used as a sort of fortune-telling game. In the barmbrack were: a pea, a stick, a piece of cloth, a small coin (originally a silver sixpence) and a ring, maybe a claddagh ring. Each item, when received in the slice, was supposed to carry a meaning to the person concerned: the pea, the person would not marry that year; the stick, would have an unhappy marriage or continually be in disputes; the cloth or rag, would have bad luck or be 12002851_1068039236547381_8260594681565605031_npoor; the coin, would enjoy good fortune or be rich; and the ring, would be wed within the year. Other articles added to the brack include a medallion, usually of the Virgin Mary to symbolize going into the priesthood or to the Nuns, although this tradition is not widely continued in the present day.

Barmbrack (Irish: bairín breac), also called Barnbrack or often shortened to brack, is a yeasted bread with added sultanas and raisins.

Barm Brack – Arán Breac (Speckled Bread)
Ingredients:
1 lb flour
6 oz sugar
1 lb mixed dried fruit
1 tsp baking powder
1 egg
1 tsp all spice/mixed spice
Pot of hot Irish tea

The Irish ‘lucky’ ingredients: (can be a choking hazard for small children)
‘gold’ ring, to foretell marriage within a year
small coin, to forecast wealth
small piece of cloth to forecast poverty
little piece matchstick to forecast the husband will beat his wife
thimble to forecast spinsterhood
button to forecast bachelorhood

Method:
Wrap each ‘lucky’ item carefully in wax paper.
The trick to making a Barm Brack like soda bread is the soaking of fruit overnight in the
tea. While this makes the dried fruit softer and more appealing in general,
one must be careful when mixing the dough not to over-knead or the
re-hydrated fruit will crumble. Add the sugar and egg to the fruit mix the next day. Sift in the remaining dry ingredients. Mix gently. Stir in the wrapped ‘lucky’ items and try to distribute them evenly. Use a 7″ round
baking tin at 350°F for 80 minutes. Cool on a wire baking rack.

The Brack can be made a week in advance and stored in an air-tight
container. It is traditional that only he/she who has baked the cake should
cut and serve the slices, as only he/she may know where are the ‘lucky’
items and will distribute them equitably!!

Halloween, Irish Recipes, Irish Traditions

Colcannon (I love this stuff) A tradition Halloween meal.

12042678_10156171951110245_934213265156568500_nColcannon Recipe

Ingredients:
• 1 lb potatoes
• 1 lb kale or cabbage
• Onion or leek
• 1/4 cup milk
• Butter, salt and pepper

Directions:
First peel and boil the potatoes. Then chop the kale or cabbage up small. Steam cabbage until tender, about 8 minutes. Then saute the onion until golden. Mash the potatoes well, and mix with the cabbage and onion. Add a wee bit of milk and butter to get that creamy consistency. Then salt and pepper to taste. Bake in a medium oven for about 15 minutes.

Irish Recipes

Irish Beef Stew with Irish Stout

Ingredients:

  • 4 tbsp plain flour (corn starch if you want it to be gluten free)
  • 1 ½lb stew beef, trimmed and cut into chunks
  • 1 tsp chopped fresh thyme
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 2-3 large carrots, sliced
  • 1 ½ cups beef stock (from a stock cube is fine)
  • 1 cup of Irish Stout (omit for gluten free and increase beef stock by 1 cup)
  • dash of Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 lbs even-sized peeled potatoes
  • 3 tbsp (1 ½oz) Irish Butter
  • salt and pepper

Coat beef with corn starch. Brown stew beef in a pot with butter and onions. Add carrots, thyme, potatoes, stock, stout and Worcestershire sauce. Bring to a boil. Simmer for 1 1/2-2 hours until beef is tender. Add salt and pepper to taste. Irish Beef Stew

Irish Recipes, St. Patricks Day

Irish Soda Bread Recipe

Irish Soda Bread

This Irish soda bread makes a great breakfast treat. Or omit the raisins and sugar, and add caraway seeds for bread that’s perfect for dinner.

Traditional Irish Soda Bread
Traditional Irish Soda Bread

(we prefer the raisins)

Ingredients

3 cups all-purpose flour
1½ teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons sugar
1½ cups 1% buttermilk
⅔ cup raisins

Preparation

Preheat oven to 375.
Whisk dry ingredients in a large bowl. Slowly add buttermilk, stirring until a soft dough is formed.
Add raisins, and lightly knead the dough on a floured surface for about a minute. Form into a round, slightly flattened shape.
Place dough on a cookie sheet covered with parchment paper.
Using a sharp knife, make an “x” on the top of the dough, about ½-inch deep. Bake until golden brown, about 40 minutes.

Irish Blessings, Irish Recipes

Traditional Irish Shepherd’s Pie

New Image

This is what I’m fixing to make tonight. How about you?

Cottage pie or shepherd’s pie is a meat pie with a crust of mashed potato.The term cottage pie is known to have been in use in 1791, when the potato was being introduced as an edible crop affordable for the poor. (The term “cottage” meaning a modest dwelling for rural workers). In early cookery books, the dish was a means of using leftover roasted meat of any kind (it was a recipe to re-purpose left overs) , and the pie dish was lined with mashed potato as well as having a mashed potato crust on top.
The term “shepherd’s pie” appeared around 1877, and since then it has been used synonymously with “cottage pie”, in America and Ireland regardless of whether the principal ingredient was beef or “mutton.”

Our families traditional Irish Shepherd’s Pie recipe was born from many a cold nights at our family cottage. Often in Ireland you can find a mix package.
Ingredients
o 1 tablespoon olive oil
o 1 teaspoon black pepper and or salt
o 1lb – 1 1/2lb ground beef
o 1 large onion, finely diced
o 3 -4 large carrots, finely diced
o 1 cup frozen peas (or if you’re in a rush just use frozen peas and carrots)
o thyme, finely chopped to taste if you have it.
o 2 tablespoons flour or corn starch
o 1 or 2 tablespoon butter
o 1 can tomato paste
o 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
o 1 cup beef stock
o mashed potatoes made w/butter and milk (6 cups, fresh, or store bought or leftover if you’re in a rush)
o paprika and grated Parmesan cheese (optional)

Directions…
Pre-heat oven to 400°.
Sauté carrots in the olive oil until they get tender if using fresh. Then  add the onions and sauté for a minute or two then add the chop meat. Season with black pepper, salt (I prefer sea salt) and thyme. Cook it all up until browned then drain fat away.
Add the butter and frozen peas. Sprinkle on flour or corn starch and mix well. Then  add tomato paste, and Worcestershire sauce. Mix is all very well. Then add the beef stock. (I also add a wee bit of stout but that’s our family secret…shh!)
Allow mixture to reduce down until you have a thick meaty gravy. Season to taste.
Remove mixture from the heat. Then grease up an oven proof dish about 9×13 with butter and add the meat.
Spoon the mashed potatoes over top. Your can get creative with your pattern. Add some butter and sprinkle with paprika and Parmesan cheese if using. Bake for about 30 minutes, really until the mash potato are browned on top.
Serve with some crusty bread or traditional Irish Brown Bread to mop up that yummy sauce! You can purchase brown bread or a mix at your local Irish Shop.

Halloween, Irish Recipes

Lambs Wool

lambs wool

After you feast on traditional Irish foods on Halloween you will need to wash it down with an old drink called Lambswool. The name Lambswool is believed to be derivative of the Irish Gaelic, “La Mas Nbhal” meaning ‘Feast of the Apples. The Gaelic saying was pronounced “Lammas-ool”. This ultimately evolved into Lambswool. There are several of recipes for Lambswool that exist. But the drink basically consists of baked crushed apples(cored and crushed without skins), which are added to milk, and hot spiced ale, hard cider and or wine. Grate in nutmeg and some ginger. Add sugar according to taste.

About This Recipe

“This is a traditional cider drink that was made and enjoyed on Twelfth Night (January 16-17) in Elizabethan England. It is said that it gets its name from the whiteness of the roasted apples as they fluff out of their skins while they cook. I haven’t made it yet, but I cant let go of the recipe every time I go to clean out my recipe box.”

Ingredients

    • 4 pints real ale ( Newcastle or similar)
    • 2 -3 large apples
    • 1 cup hard alcoholic cider ( such as Woodchuck or Hornsby’s)
    • 1 cinnamon stick
    • 3 cloves
    • sugar

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 180°C: 350°F: Gas 4.
  2. Core the apples and bake in 350 degree oven for about 40 minutes until very soft.
  3. Squeeze all of the pulp from the apples and discard the skins then fluff the puree with a fork.
  4. Heat the ale and cider with the cinnamon stick and cloves.
  5. Add the apple puree and sugar to taste.
  6. Serve immediately.

Recipe courtesy of Food.com

Irish Recipes, St. Patricks Day

Irish Soda Bread Recipe

It’s almost March 17th ….Time to make the Soda Bread !!!
I love Jane FitzGerald’s Blue Ribbon Feis Soda Bread Recipe
Traditional Irish Soda Bread
Traditional Irish Soda Bread

Ingredients:
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 to 2 tablespoons caraway seeds – optional. A friend who lives in Cork tells me that caraway seeds are strictly personal taste and are not normally used in traditional soda bread recipes.
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 cups buttermilk.

Method:
Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Lightly grease, then flour baking sheet. In large bowl, mix flour, baking soda, salt and optional caraway seeds. Mix in buttermilk to form dough into ball. You may need to add a little more buttermilk. Turn out onto lightly floured surface and knead until dough holds together, about 1 minute. Shape dough into a 6-inch round. Place on prepared baking sheet. Cut 1-inch deep X across top of bread, reaching almost to edges. Bake until bread is golden brown and sounds hollow when tapped on bottom, about 40 minutes.Transfer bread to rack and cool. If not serving right away, wrap loaf in tea towel to prevent it from drying out too much. If not eaten in entirety, wrap well in foil or plastic wrap to keep as moist as possible.

Irish Soda Bread Dish With Stand> http://www.theirishjewelrycompany.com/-strse-1006/Irish-Soda-Bread-Dish/Detail.bok

About us: The Irish Jewelry Company was founded by award-winning designer Jennifer Derrig.  The Irish Jewelry Company collection offers classic and contemporary Irish Jewelry including Claddagh rings, all handcrafted.

Explore The Irish Jewelry Company Claddagh ring collection today and start your own Irish tradition today.