Interesting Stories, Ireland, Irish Legends, Irish Traditions, Peaceful Cottage, Travel Ireland

The Irish Flag Meaning and History

Perhaps one of the best-known symbols of Ireland is the Irish flag. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out why the flag of the Republic of Ireland is called the tricolorThe Irish flag consists of three different colors. The flag is a rectangle with three broad vertical stripes in the colors green, white, and orange.

Whenever the flag is flown, it is always flown such that the green stripe is closest to the flagpole. Each band is required to be of the same proportions, and the overall size of the Irish flag should be proportionately double its height. There is no question that each of the three colors on the Irish flag represents something significant.

Meaning of the Irish Flag Colors

What do the different colors on the Irish flag represent and what do they stand for? This is perhaps the topic that comes up the most frequently when people ask us about the Irish flag.

The color green is associated with Roman Catholics. On Saint Patrick’s Day, did you happen to notice how many people were wearing emerald or shamrock green? Orange is the color associated with Irish Presbyterians. Because of their allegiance to the protestant William of Orange, King William III of England, they are popularly referred to as “Orangemen,”, particularly on the Northern Irish side of the border. This moniker originated in Northern Ireland. The yearning for unity and peace between the two communities is represented by the single white stripe in the center of the flag. During this time when the Irish tricolor was first flown, the country was deeply divided between Catholics and Protestants.

A Wee Bit O Irish Flag History

The history of the flag that represents Ireland is a fascinating one. The present version of the Irish tricolor was conceived of and created by a collective of French ladies who were sympathetic to the Irish struggle.

They gave Thomas Francis Meagher, who was the head of the political Irish Nationalist Movement at the time, the tricolor in the year 1848. Meagher was the face of the movement at the time.  When he was presented with the flag, he is reputed to have made the following statement: “The white in the center signifies a lasting truce between Orange and Green and I trust that beneath its folds the hands of Irish Protestants and Irish Catholics may be clasped in generous and heroic brotherhood.”

When Meagher hoisted the tricolor in Waterford, it proudly fluttered for eight days and nights until it was brought down by the British. Meagher was responsible for hanging the flag.

The uprisings that occurred across Europe in 1848 served as an inspiration for Meagher and the other members of the Young Irelanders. In April of 1848, a group of them went to France to offer their congratulations to the revolutionaries there on the successful toppling of King Louis Philippe I. There, Meagher was given a tricolor Irish flag that had been fashioned out of French silk as a gift.

The Irish Flag did not appear in Dublin until Gearóid O’Sullivan raised the tricolor for the first time at Dublin’s General Post Office in 1916, during the Easter Rebellion. Prior to that, the flag had not been flown there since 1848.

It encapsulated the spirit of the revolutionary cause, and from that point on, the tricolor was considered to be the flag of the Republic of Ireland or Sinn Féin. Even though the flag of Ireland was flown proudly across the land from that point forward, it wasn’t until 1937 that it was given constitutional recognition as Ireland’s official national flag.

The official name for the flag that flies over Ireland.

Bratach na hÉireann is the Irish term for the tricolor flag and ensign, “bratach” being the Irish word for flag. This name was given to the flag and ensign by the Irish.

What does it mean when you see the Irish flag?

The following is the simple and clear interpretation of the Irish flag color meaning:

  • Green: Roman Catholics are represented by the color green.
  • White: The color white stands for the harmony and concord that both of these parties are hoping to achieve.
  • Orange: Orange is the color that signifies the Irish Protestants.

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 Great Irish Pubs of Ireland

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Interesting Stories, Ireland, Irish Traditions, Travel Ireland

Great Irish Pubs of Ireland

Are you planning a trip this year to Ireland? If so you will definitely want to check out this list of must-see Irish pubs in Ireland. It is imperative that you pay a visit to these fabulous Irish pubs and bars at least once in your lifetime in order to experience traditional Irish music, the warmth of Irish hospitality, Irish beers, and much more.

Seáns Bar in Athlone, County Westmeath, which was built in the 10th century, has the distinction of “oldest bar in Ireland.” Irish pubs have been around for close to a millennium, making it the clear frontrunner for the title of “oldest pub in Ireland.” The Brazen Head, located in Dublin City, is recognized as the “oldest bar in Dublin” due to its foundation in the year 1198. With that being said we have compiled a short list of a few other Irish pubs with think are worth seeing while traveling Ireland.

Famous Irish Pubs:

O’Connor’s Famous Pub, Co. Galway

O’Connor’s Famous Pub is located in County Galway and is the ideal setting for any Galway Girl. O’Connor’s Bar, which is located in the picturesque seaside location of Salthill, asserts that it was Ireland’s first singing bar. That might be argued either way, but thanks to Ed Sheeran, it is without a doubt the most popular pub in all of Ireland.

O’Connors makes an appearance in the music video that Ed Sheeran created for his smash single “Galway Girl,” which also features the actress Saoirse Ronan. If you are interested in going to O’Connor’s, you should know that it is a TRUE Irish bar, which means that it does not have any televisions, does not sell any food, and only opens at night. There is no way you should skip a night spent here.

Matt Molloy’s, Co. Mayo

A leader in both drink and music, Matt Molloy’s may be found in County Mayo. Where can you hear the greatest traditional Irish music performed live seven nights a week? That would be the Irish pub Matt Molloy in Westport.

The proprietor of this bar is also a member of the internationally acclaimed traditional Irish music group The Chieftains. The relationship to the great Irish band The Chieftains is the most effective form of advertising for the establishment. It is one of the most famous Irish pubs and bars in all of Ireland due to the wonderful nights filled with music and craic that can be enjoyed at this establishment. If you are in Westport we definitely recommend having a pint at Matt Molloy’s Pub. In a word, if you want to enjoy a night filled with craic and music in a lively bar, you should put Matt Molloy’s on your list of potential destinations.

Temple Bar in Dublin

The Temple Bar, Co. Dublin

Temple Bar, which is located in County Dublin, can be found smack dab in the middle of Dublin’s most well-known bar area. Temple Bar is a name that is recognized in many parts of the world, and you will be happy to learn that there is, in fact, a Temple Bar.

The Temple Bar is famous all throughout Ireland and is known for being the ideal location to unwind with a pint. It is impossible to adequately describe the vibe both inside and outside of the pub; it is simply something that one needs to feel for themselves. This year, you really must put a trip to The Temple Bar on your must-do list.

Tigh Neachtain, Galway City

Tigh Neachtain, which is located on the corner of Cross Street and has been selling pints of beer since 1894, is a popular establishment in Galway for both its cuisine and its drink. Try to get a spot inside for one of their live music sessions, or arrive early to have a better chance of getting a table outside in their sunny drinking area. If you are able to secure a seat inside, there is a chance that you will never want to leave. Since the bar is a huge supporter of music and art (it is located in Galway, after all), you can anticipate a lot of cultural events occurring around the time of the Galway Arts Festival in July.

The Crown Liquor Saloon, Co. Antrim

One of the most well-known pubs and bars in all of Ireland is located in the county of Antrim and is called The Crown Liquor SaloonThe Crown, which can be situated in the middle of Belfast city, was formerly thought of as the most powerful Victorian gin palace in the whole country. It still has many of the characteristics that were typical of the Victorian era, such as gas lighting, intricate wood carving, and polished brass. This bar is not only difficult to miss, but also not one you want to miss out on.

The Folk House, Co. Cork

The Folk House in Kinsale, which is located in the county of Cork, is a traditional Irish tavern. Due to its laid-back ambiance, blazing open fireplace, and exposed stone walls, the Folk House in Kinsale is the epitome of a traditional Irish bar in its purest form.  Additionally, the bar offers a wide variety of beers and whiskeys for patrons to pick from.

Fun Facts About Irish Pubs:

Why were bars originally called public houses?

A picture that illustrates the history of pubs in Ireland. It wasn’t until the latter half of the 17th century that the phrase public house was coined. Prior to that time, “alehouses,” “taverns,” and “inns” were the terms that were used to refer to establishments that were accessible to the general public.

Why do people associate Ireland with pubs?

The genuine atmosphere and friendly atmosphere of Irish pubs have contributed to their widespread popularity. People rave about how much fun the Authentic Irish Pub is, how inviting the staff is, and how much they want to be a part of the community there.

What are the origins of the Irish pub?

The Romans are responsible for the establishment of most aspects of life in the western world, including the bar. As the Roman Empire spread into Celtic Europe, its soldiers, traders, and colonists were able to travel more easily because of the construction of roads. Approximately every 20 miles or so along these highways, there would be a “Tabernae”…or “Tavern.”

What to Know When Visiting an Irish Pub …

One thing is for certain is that the traditional watering hole known as the Irish Pub plays a significant role in Irish civil society. Many of our most accomplished authors got their start in Irish pubs. All of these authors, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Oscar Wilde, and Brendan Behan, produced short tales in which the Irish pub served as the primary setting. In Ireland’s pubs, many of the world’s greatest authors have gone in quest of new ideas.

It is customary for the person who invites you to an Irish bar to pay for the first round of drinks upon entering the establishment. However, in order to maintain the spirit of the occasion, you should place the following order before the other customers have finished their beverages. The Irish Pub in Ireland is, and always has been, the most popular destination for vacationers.

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 A Guide To 12 Infamous Celtic Gods And Goddesses

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Ireland, Irish Legends, Irish Traditions, Travel Ireland

The Book of Kells: Everything You Need to Know

Ireland’s Republic of Ireland’s County Meath has the little town of Kells. The four New Testament gospels are included in the Book of Kells, also known as the Book of Columba, along with additional manuscripts.

The book’s uniqueness comes from the fact that it is an illuminated manuscript with intricate graphics and pictures that are thought to have been created around the year 800 AD.

Although it is not Irish writing, the illuminated manuscript known as the Book of Kells is recognized as a priceless piece of Irish history and may be found in Dublin, Ireland’s Trinity College Library.

ORIGIN OF THE ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPT CALLED THE BOOK OF KELLS

While it is generally agreed that the monks of St. Columba were responsible for producing the Book of Kells, there is great disagreement as to where exactly they did it. It is thought that it was written by Celtic monks at the monastery’s scriptorium on the island of Iona, part of the Mull chain in western Scotland. Saint Columcille of Donegal established this monastery.

The Lindisfarne Gospels were written in Iona around 700 AD, and the Book of Kells’ design resembles those works, suggesting that Iona rather than Kells was where it was written. Viking invasions of coastal monasteries were a possibility around the start of the ninth century. The majority of this book is said to have been written on Iona and carried back to the Abbey of Kells for preservation.

The relics of Columcille have reportedly transported to Kells from his home County Donegal in the year 1090 AD, according to the Annals of Tigernach, another ancient Irish chronicle.

Two gospels were found among these artifacts, one of which was presumably the Book of Kells. The Book of Durrow is supposed to have been the second gospel. The church at Kells was destroyed in 1641 as a result of an Irish uprising. The English governor of Kells sent the book to Dublin for storage sometime around 1653.

A few years later, Henry Jones, a former soldier in Cromwell’s army, is said to have helped bring the Book of Kells to Trinity College. The Long Room of the Old Library at Trinity College is where you may discover this masterpiece today in Dublin, Ireland. The 340 folios or leaves, each made of calfskin vellum, are bound together in a book that is around thirteen inches broad and ten inches thick. Although this might look substantial, the original was significantly bigger. But over time, thirty folios were lost, and even the ones that were still there had to be reduced for upkeep and rebinding.

Why Was the Book of Kells Created?

The book’s purpose was more ceremonial than practical, despite binding the gospels’ material together. It wasn’t intended to be read during mass. The creation and presentation of the material within the book itself are one of the main justifications for this notion. The text itself is haphazardly scrawled and scattered throughout the pages, in contrast to the carefully thought out and executed images and illustrations.

There is word and paragraph duplication, the omission of crucial phrases, and a lack of attempt to fix these serious mistakes. This book was admired for its decorations and exquisite pictures, not for its content.

The book’s authors appear to prefer the artwork and illustrations above the readings. In a nutshell, the appearance and aesthetics of the book took precedence over its practical utility.

What is the Vulgate?

The fourth-century Latin Vulgate is a translation of the Bible. According to legend, the gospels of the new testament were transferred directly from the Vulgate into the Book of Kells. However, as was already said, the scribes’ compositions were erratic and haphazard. There is the suggestion that they relied on their own memory of what they had previously read rather than copying their lines verbatim from the Vulgate.

The book has additional material in addition to the text, and each page of prose is accompanied by an image. These images feature meticulous details and vivid hues such, among others, purple, pink, green, and yellow.

The Book has Irish-Celtic themes and initials that were influenced by the Hiberno-Saxon style of the 7th century. Along with this, there is also the Anglo-Saxon custom of vibrant color and upbeat compositions. What distinguishes the book are its intricate designs and exquisite craftsmanship.

The illuminations are also another striking element of the book. They span 10 full pages and show small images of evangelical symbols. Some of these portrayals have survived.

The canon tables are given their own elaborately decorated pages in the Book of Kells, which may be found in Ireland. You will discover the emblems that represent each of the four evangelists, with Matthew being shown as a Man, Mark being represented by the Lion, Luke being linked to the Calf, and John being given the Eagle as his emblem.

Additionally discovered are the introductory passages of each of the Gospels. Breves causae are the names given to these condensed versions of the gospel tales. The Vulgate, which was finished by Saint Jerome in 384 AD, serves as the basis for this work, which is written in Latin and is dedicated to the four Gospels. There is also a picture of Christ, in addition to creative depictions of the Virgin Mary and the Christ Child.

The Book of Kells is Written on Vellum

Vellum, which was made from the skins of around 185 animals, was used rather than paper for the writing in the Book of Kells. The monks who lived in Ireland’s monasteries managed large herds of cattle not just to supply milk and food for themselves, but also as a source of vellum, which was the principal writing medium that the monks used. Following the hand stitching that was used to bind the vellum pages together, a protective cover was created out of either leather or wood.

The text of the book is written in an italicized script that is referred to as “insular majuscule.” The intricate knotwork and links that can be found in the images are well-known for the complexity of their design and the attention to detail that went into creating them. It is likely that the book was initially kept in a shrine, which is a jewel-encrusted casing made of gold that is used to contain treasures. Around the year 1000 A.D., the volumes were taken by thieves. It had been buried beneath the ground when it was discovered, but the priceless holder it had been holding was never found.

During the nineteenth century, the book went through a process called “rebinding,” during which the page margins were, regrettably, trimmed and gilded. In 1953, the book underwent yet another rebinding, which resulted in the creation of four distinct volumes. This was done with the intention of assisting in the preservation of its magnificent and rare pages. Two of the four volumes are currently on exhibit at Trinity College in Dublin, where they will remain there indefinitely. The first book has pages of text, whereas the second volume is solely dedicated to displaying illustrations on its pages.

The Book of Kells is an Irish Treasure

The Book of Kells was the most valuable artifact in all of medieval Europe. The Book of Kells is a stunning example of Irish artwork and is considered to be a national treasure. Each year, hundreds of people travel to the Trinity College Library in Dublin in the hope of catching a sight of the two volumes that are kept on exhibit there.

Interesting Stories, Ireland, Irish Traditions, St. Patricks Day, Travel Ireland

Learn All About Irish Dance and Step Dancing

Learn All About Irish Dance and Step Dancing

Irish Traditions , Interesting Stories , Education

stepdancing , set dance , learn all about irish dance and step dancing , irish dance , ceili

There are a variety of styles of Irish dancing, such as Irish Stepdancing, Ceili Dancing as well as Irish Set Dancing and this post will attempt to cover all of them in detail while also providing you with a wide variety of additional dance information.

The Irish culture places a significant emphasis on Irish dancing as an art form. The unusual footwork is fascinating to onlookers from other cultures, and they frequently express their delight in seeing it. The television show Riverdance is principally responsible for the widespread popularity of Irish dance that has developed over the past twenty years. However, traditional Irish dances date back hundreds of years older than that. Continue reading to find out more about this fantastic method of artistic expression!

It is thought that Irish stepdancing developed about 2,000 years ago from dances that were performed by Celtic druids in celebration of oak trees and the sun. These dances were believed to have originated in Ireland.Before the arrival of Christianity and other outside influences, the Celts and the druids who wandered the island were responsible for the development of Irish dance. These origins may be traced back to ancient times. Dancing was an important part of many of the religious rites that the Druids performed, and it was typically done in a ring around the holy trees. The Celts had their own traditional dances, which included patterns quite similar to those of the Irish. It was in 1689 when the Irish rinnce fada, which literally translates to “the long dance,” was documented for the first time. At the time, it was performed in celebration of James II’s arrival in Ireland.

But why do Irish dance schools all around the world continue to teach step dancing with their arms held straight out in front of them?

The fact of the matter is that nobody knows for certain how this age-old and one-of-a-kind kind of dance developed; nonetheless, we can have a look at some of the hypotheses that attempt to explain its origins below. One possible justification for this behavior is that it was a kind of protest on the part of Irish dancers who were compelled to perform for Queen Elizabeth I, the person who was ultimately responsible for the establishment of plantations in Ireland. According to the legend, the Queen of England once requested a performance from a troop of Irish dancers. These dancers had no choice but to refuse to extend their arms to her since they had no other option.

They kept them tightly at their sides while they danced as an act of defiance, and maybe to show their fellow countrymen that they were not enjoying themselves when they danced for Queen and the English. This is a distinct possibility given that Irish jigs were a favorite of Queen Elizabeth I’s court and that it is documented that “dances of Irish provenance” were performed there on a regular basis.

What is Ceili Dancing?

Céili dances, (pronounced “kay-lee) sometimes known as authentic éili dances, are one of the most common types of Irish folk dancing. The origins of ceili dance may be traced back several centuries, all the way to the beginning of the 1500s. It is a traditional dance that involves more than two partners. Each pair dances with one another in addition to dancing with the group, and they frequently switch partners with one another. The stretched arms and pointed toes are two characteristics that stand out prominently in ceili dance. The heys, round dances, long dances, and quadrilles that form the basis of Céil dances were largely resurrected during the Gaelic revival in the first part of the twentieth century and standardized by the Irish Dancing Commission. Céil dances are also known as ceilidhs.

What are Irish Set Dances?

The Irish set dance, sometimes referred to as “country sets,” is a well-liked style of the country’s traditional folk dancing. The quadrille, a popular court dance, was changed into set dancing so that it could be performed in rural regions. In a common configuration, it calls for four couples to be positioned in a square. The next step is for four couples at a time to make their way through the square and switch positions. In contrast to ceili, the dancers use the most of the flat section of their feet throughout the majority of the dance, with the exception of a few low kicks and flourishes.

What is Irish Stepdance?

The origins of Irish stepdance may be traced back to traditional Irish dance. Irish stepdance is a type of performance dancing. In general, it is distinguished by a rigid upper body as well as rapid and accurate motions of the feet. The Irish dance known as stepdance can be done either by an individual or by a group. Although it is sometimes danced in pairs, it is not necessary to do so in order to participate. Stepdancing requires the dancers to maintain a stiff upper body. This stands in stark contrast to the movement of their feet and legs, which consists of a series of very quick hops, high kicks, and intricate footwork.

Riverdance Introduced Irish Dance to the World

There is no such thing as an Irish dancing style known as Riverdance. Instead, it is the name of a professional stage production that incorporates vast numbers of setdancers who earn their living in the industry. The audience will be told Irish tales via the use of dance, music, and light during the presentation. Despite having its beginnings in Ireland, the act is now performed all over the world. Riverdance is a stage production that focuses mostly on the music and dance styles that are common in Ireland. It was originally conceived as an interval performance act at the 1994 Eurovision Song Contest and included Irish dance champions Jean Butler and Michael Flatley in addition to the vocal group Anna. Bill Whelan was responsible for the composition of the show’s soundtrack.

Celtic Legends, Ireland, Travel Ireland

What Are the Different Types of Fairies?

What Are the Different Types of Fairies?

Travel to Ireland , Legends and Folklore

types of fairies , fairies

What exactly are fairies? And where exactly do fairies originate? When you question various people, you will receive different responses each time you do so. These mysterious figures have been interpreted as anything from gods to the souls of infants who have not been baptized to an ancient race of miniature humans. They are the protectors of animals and holy natural sites, yet at one time they may have been thought of as gods. They are the spirits of nature. I’ve always had the impression that the answer was somewhere in the middle. Additionally, as was discussed before, this is contingent upon the culture as well.

For any Irish lass there is nothing more captiviating than the faery world. Childhood facination with all things fairy including films that had fairies, fairy tale novels and fairy figurines of all shapes and sizes facinate kids and adults alike. But do you know there are more than a few different kinds of fairies. And that the land of the fay is far more gorgeously complex and perilous than ever envisioned! Pixies and garden fairies are the two types of fairies that are most often seen in popular culture and media. However, this does not account for brownies, elves, gnomes, dwarfs, and a great many more beings.

Fairy Types

– Nymphs: In Greek mythology, nymphs are described as being similar to fairies who live in nature. They typically take the form of stunning ladies and are linked to natural settings such as lakes, mountains, springs, or meadows in where they might be found.

– Hobgoblins: This fairy lives on farms, and since it loves the warmth of the fire, it may enter the house to be closer to one. Hobgoblins may be found in the countryside. They may be a nuisance on occasion, but other than that, they are normally of a nice disposition until they are insulted by someone. They are considered to be a member of the Brownie tribe.

– Elfs: In Norse mythology, there are two different kinds of elves: the Dark Elves and the Light Elves. Trolls are the common name given to Dark Elves in Scotland. In Danish folklore, male elves would sometimes take the form of elderly men, and if you approached too near to them, they would open their lips and make you ill with their breath. Young men were cautioned to stay away from the attractive elf lest he win their heart over and cause them to abandon their sweethearts who were dancing in the moonlight.

– Dwarves: This specific fairy is related with the folklore of Iceland and India. Dwarves are said to have lived underground and dug the earth for rich stones and metals. They gained the capacity to see through walls and became wise as a result of the magical stones they uncovered.

– Gnomes: Although many ancient legends associate gnomes with goblins or dwarves, gnomes were first categorized as earth elementals in the 15th century. This classification stuck with them until the 20th century. It was stated that Gnomes had incredible speed, but unlike other elementals, they did not possess everlasting souls. However, they did live far longer than humans. They are also well-known for the immense valuables that they preserve.

– Hobgoblins: This fairy lives in farms, and since it loves the warmth of the fire, it may enter the house to be closer to one. Hobgoblins may be found in the countryside. They may be a nuisance on occasion, but other than that, they are normally of a nice disposition until they are insulted by someone. They are considered to be a member of the Brownie tribe.

– Brownies: These lone fairies get connected to a house and reside in a dark corner of the home, in a closet, or in a hollow tree next to the home. – Brownies may be found in the United Kingdom. Brownies are helpful fairies who maintain order and cleanliness. It is said that they value it when you show your appreciation by providing them with a bowl of cream as a treat.

– Pixies: This kind of fairy is connected to the West Country in England and is referred to as a Piskie in Cornwall. Pixies may also be seen in Scotland. People in these areas virtually universally believed in pixies and piskies many centuries ago, and some of them even built “pisky pows” on their roofs to provide a type of ballroom for the fairies they thought lived there. Pixies are naughty creatures that are capable of bringing either good or bad fortune to human beings.

Irish Legends, St. Patricks Day, Travel Ireland

The Legend of the Irish Leprechaun

Leprechaun at night

The legend of the Leprechaun is one of the most famous stories in Ireland, and it refers to a magical kind of fairy that is initially tied to the Tuatha De Danann of Irish mythology. The Leprechaun is said to have been one of the first people to bring gold to Ireland.

Leprechauns are described in folklore as being little beings that often take the shape of an elderly gentleman dressed in a green or red cloak. They are known to be naughty little creatures who like to create shoes and save their gold money in a pot of gold that is buried at the end of a rainbow. You may find that precious pot of gold at the end of a rainbow but if you manage to catch a leprechaun, he will grant you three wishes as long as you set him free at the end of the day.

The Origin of the Leprechaun

The majority of tales concerning leprechauns may be traced back to accounts of water spirits from the eighth century that were referred to as “luchorpán,” which means “little body.” It is stated that these spirits fused with a house fairy and gained a taste for binge drinking as a result; hence, no basement was immune from their influence. According to the findings of other experts, the name “leprechaun” originates from the Irish word “leath brogan,” which may be translated as “shoemaker.”

It is interesting to notice that leprechauns are commonly linked with riches, namely gold coins. However, in reality, leprechauns are cobblers, which is not a profession that one would typically consider to be profitable. Despite this, the legend of the pot of gold lives on, and there are still some who try to find the long-lost treasure.

Pot with gold coins, hat and clover on green grass, space for text. St. Patrick’s Day celebration

The Leprechaun’s Pot of Gold

The story that leprechauns dig up pots full of gold money and hide them at the end of a rainbow is the one that is told the most often. According to this version of the legend, leprechauns locate gold coins buried in the ground and put them all in a pot. It’s better for the plot if you just ignore the fact that a rainbow doesn’t really start or stop anywhere specific.

Why leprechauns actually require gold is a very different question, given that they are unable to really spend it in any way. It has been hypothesized by some researchers that this gold is employed by leprechauns as a ruse to deceive people. Considering the Leprechauns’ fondness for pranks, this is not an implausible hypothesis at all.

In the majority of the Irish folktales that feature the Leprechaun, he is portrayed as a scoundrel who would trick people whenever he has the chance. When people do manage to trap leprechauns in stories, they are easily tricked by the magical creature since leprechauns typically take use of a person’s greed as a weapon against them. Even if you think you know everything there is to know about leprechauns, you might be surprised to learn some of the mysterious trickster’s background details.

Leprechauns in Popular Culture Today

The concept of leprechauns has been modernized, and the mythology itself now functions as something of a tourist attraction that brings a significant number of visitors from the United States, in particular, to Ireland. The image of the leprechaun has become so popular in the United States that it is used as the mascot for Notre Dame University and as the logo for Lucky Charms cereal. Of course, not everything having to do with leprechauns is amusing or especially classy, as seen by the dreadful leprechaun movies starring Warwick Davis. One example of this may be found in the previous sentence.
It is safe to assume that a sizable number of Irish people are aggravated by the negative racial stereotypes that are associated with leprechauns, however the folklore surrounding leprechauns does include a lesson that can be drawn from it. People should heed the warning and avoid participating in any “get rich fast” scams since it is common practice for them to con those who are looking for a pot of gold.

In addition, you shouldn’t try to grab what isn’t yours, and you shouldn’t meddle with things that are above your level of comprehension. In the end, we shouldn’t take the stories of the leprechaun too seriously; instead, we should let them entertain and pleasure us.

Leprechaun Facts

Did you know Leprechauns were first depicted as wearing red?

In popular culture, a Leprechaun is often portrayed as a guy who is dressed in all green at all times. Leprechauns, on the other hand, are depicted in Irish legend as men who dress in red and wear hats with three points at the top. In his book titled Legends and Stories of Ireland, which was published in 1831, Irish author Samuel Lover refers to leprechauns in this manner.

Did you know there are no female leprechauns?

The book “A History of Irish Fairies” written by Carolyn White claims that there is no evidence of any female Leprechauns ever having existed. This, of course, indicates that leprechauns defy the conventional rules of biology by virtue of the fact that they are still there, and there is no evidence that tells the tale of how they reproduce. According to the aforementioned text, Irish leprechauns are essentially the twisted offspring of fairies.

Did you know there is a town in County Louth that does a yearly Leprechaun search?

In spite of the fact that the Leprechaun is said to have been there for well over a thousand years, the most recent alleged sighting took place near 1989 in Carlingford, County Louth, and was reported by a bar owner named P.J. O’Hare. O’Hare claims that he was able to hear cries coming from a well and that he discovered the bones and clothes of a leprechaun, which are now on display at his tavern. The community currently has a Leprechaun search on an annual basis, with the goal being to locate plastic replicas of the legendary monster.

Did you know that under European Union legislation leprechauns are considered to be a protected species?

The Sliabh Foy Loop route near Carlingford has been designated as an official protected area for the 236 leprechauns who are believed to reside in Ireland. Local lobbyists, one of whom is Kevin Woods, a native of Carlingford, were successful in their efforts to persuade the European Union to safeguard the region, and as a result, it is now covered by the European Habitats Directive.

Celtic Holidays, Interesting Stories, News, Travel Ireland

Summer in Ireland Traveling the Emerald Isle

Peaceful Cottage Ireland

Even though the first day of summer does not arrive until June 1st with the summer solstice on June 21st, ancient Celts believed that the month of May, which they celebrated as Lá Bealtaine, marked the beginning of summer. And who wouldn’t welcome the arrival of summer a little bit earlier? Continue reading to learn more about this ancient Celtic festival and the rituals that are still practiced in Ireland to this very day.

Bringing the sun back to life

Bealtaine, which occurs at the beginning of May, is a celebration of the “rekindling” of the sun and the transition to longer days and shorter nights. This holiday falls approximately halfway between the spring equinox and the summer solstice. Along with Imbolc (Spring), Lnasa (Autumn), and Samhain (Winter), it was one of the four most important seasonal feasts celebrated in Celtic Ireland (Winter).

The celebration of Bealtaine may be traced back thousands of years to Uisneach, a hill located in the symbolic heart of Ireland. It is said that the goddess Ériu, who is credited with naming Ireland, sits on this hill. It is said that the kings of the Celtic people would marry Ériu in a ceremony and then light a large fire on top of this significant location to ensure a prosperous summer. This would bind the kings’ destinies to the land. Other large Bealtaine bonfires were started from it, and locals lit their own hearth fires from them. It was visible from nearly a fourth of the island of Ireland.

May Day in Ireland

May Day has been celebrated in Ireland since pagan times as the feast of Bealtaine and in latter times as Mary’s day. Traditionally, bonfires were lit to mark the coming of summer and to banish the long nights of winter. Officially Irish May Day holiday is the first Monday in May. Old traditions such as bonfires are no longer widely observed, though the practice persists in some places across the country. Limerick, Clare and many other people in other counties still keep on this tradition such as the town of Arklow in Co. Wicklow.

Happy Summer Solstice!

In Ireland, Midsummer or the summer solstice takes places on 21st June. This is the longest day of the year when the sun reaches its highest position in the sky in the Northern Hemisphere. The celebration of Summer Solstice in Ireland is tied to their ancient landmarks and Neolithic sites such as Newgrange that dates back to 5,000 years ago. Also in Co. Meath, is the Hill of Tara which has deep links to Irish folklore and is a popular location to celebrate the solstice.

Summer Holidays in Ireland

And all-around Ireland, plenty of people will take advantage of the long May bank holiday weekend to wind down and relax, and perhaps, like their Celtic predecessors, have some fun with family and friends to get the summer season started off right.