Celtic Holidays, Celtic Jewelry, Irish Jewelry, Irish Traditions, St. Patricks Day

Flaunt your Irish Pride with Saint Patrick’s Day Jewelry

Saint Patrick’s Day is the time-honored Irish holiday always celebrated on March 17th.

The luck of the Irish is always celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day that has become a global celebration of Irish culture usually celebrated with parades and pub gatherings. On St. Patrick’s Day many people of Irish decent flaunt there best Irish jewelry proudly. Adding a beautiful piece of Irish jewelry, like a claddagh ring, emerald green shamrock earrings or Harp Brooch to your St. Patrick’s Day look adds the perfect festive finishing touch. Luckily, there’s still time to get your perfect Irish gift a piece of St. Patrick’s Day jewelry in time for March 17th. Your local St. Patrick’s Day parade might be canceled in 2021 but your Irish spirit has not been. So treat yourself to a special piece of Irish jewelry to lift your spirits or give an Irish gift of jewelry, a unique present for a special someone who can use a little Irish luck. 

The Claddagh Ring Means Friendship, Love and Loyalty

The Claddagh Ring, arguably the most versatile piece of Irish jewelry is world renowned, and are worn by both men and women, single or taken. Irish Claddagh rings are named for the ancient fishing village of Claddagh, near Galway, Ireland, dating back to the 17th century. The Claddagh ring in Irish is fáinne Chladaigh and is a traditional Irish ring which represents love, loyalty, and friendship. The hands represent friendship, the heart represents love, and the crown represents loyalty. The Irish Claddagh ring, as currently known, was first produced in the 17th century.

The Shamrock, the symbol of Ireland.

The majestic shamrock was chosen as the national symbol of Ireland because Saint Patrick used the 3 leafed clover to teach the Holy Trinity to the pagan Celts. The Celts understood the significance of the shamrock forming a triad because they believed three was a mystical number. The Trinity is the idea that God is really three-in-one: The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit. The word shamrock can be traced back to the Irish word seamróg or seamair óg, meaning “little clover”. The tradition of wearing a Shamrock on Saint Patrick’s Day can be traced back to the early 1700s. The Irish have long considered shamrocks as good-luck symbols and today people of many other nationalities also believe they bring good luck. Shamrock jewelry has gained in popularity in recent times.  In Ireland shamrocks and shamrock jewelry are traditionally worn at weddings for good luck. Often tucked in a bouquet or used as filler with a boutonniere. Today lucky Irish shamrock jewelry is available in a wide select of shamrock earrings, shamrock brooch,  shamrock necklaces and shamrock rings.

What is the Irish Harp?

The Irish harp is a political symbol of Ireland. for centuries. The exact origin of the Irish Harp is really known. The Irish Harp is a symbol of Ireland and Irish pride. The Irish harp became an emblem of resistance to the Crown and England. The Irish harp, although not as renowned as the shamrock is the official emblem of Ireland. The Irish harp status as the official insignia of Ireland dates centuries and the elegant instrument’s history talks much about the history of the Emerald Isle. Our elegant Irish Harp Brooch and Irish Harp Necklace accented by brilliant gold shamrocks is a noteworthy piece of Irish jewelry.

About us: The Irish Jewelry Company was founded by award-winning designer Jennifer Derrig.  The Irish Jewelry Company Claddagh collection offers classic and contemporary Claddagh rings, all handcrafted.

Explore The Irish Jewelry Company Claddagh ring collection today and start your own Irish tradition today.

Celtic Holidays, Celtic Jewelry, Irish Jewelry, Irish Traditions, St. Patricks Day

Shamrocks: A Symbol of Ireland

WHAT IS THE MEANING OF THE SHAMROCK?

The Meaning of the Irish Shamrock, the symbol of Ireland. The word shamrock comes from the Old Irish “seamróg”, which can be translated as “little clover”. The Irish word for clover is “seamair”, and óg means “young” or “little”.

What is the difference between a shamrock and a clover?

The shamrock and the clover plants are often confused. Shamrocks are in fact a species of the clover plant.The shamrock is most common 3-leaf clover native to the beautiful Emerald Isle. A clover must have three leaves to be considered a shamrock. If the clover has more or less, then it is not a shamrock.

Why is the shamrock a symbol of Ireland?

The majestic shamrock that adorn Irish jewelry today was chosen as the national symbol of Ireland because Saint Patrick used the 3 leafed clover to teach the Holy Trinity to the pagan Celts. The Celts understood the significance of the shamrock forming a triad because they believed three was a mystical number. The Trinity is the idea that God is really three-in-one: The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit. The word shamrock can be traced back to the Irish word seamróg or seamair óg, meaning “little clover”. The tradition of wearing a Shamrock on Saint Patrick’s Day can be traced back to the early 1700s. The Irish have long considered shamrocks as good-luck symbols and today people of many other nationalities also believe they bring good luck. Shamrock jewelry has gained in popularity in recent times.  In Ireland shamrocks and shamrock jewelry are traditionally worn at weddings for good luck. Often tucked in a bouquet or used as filler with a boutineer.

What is the meaning of a 4 Leaf Clover?

According to Irish lore, each leaf represents: Love, Respect, Wealth, and Health. To find a four-leaf clover is a rare thing making it very lucky  to find.

Shamrock Necklaces Popularized in Irish Jewelry

Erin Go Bragh Pendant and the Irish Hard Pendant by The Irish Jewelry Company

Shamrock necklaces, inspired by Ireland’s national symbol. Get the Luck of the Irish with a traditional shamrock pendant! The shamrock is believed to bring good luck and not just to the Irish. In Ireland shamrocks are traditionally worn at weddings for good luck. Brides sometimes pin a shamrock charm to their bouquet.

About us: The Irish Jewelry Company was founded by award-winning designer Jennifer Derrig.  The Irish Jewelry Company collection offers classic and contemporary Irish Jewelry including Claddagh rings, all handcrafted.

Explore The Irish Jewelry Company Claddagh ring collection today and start your own Irish tradition today.

Celtic Holidays, Irish Traditions, Irish Wit & Wisdom, St. Patricks Day

Saint Patrick’s Day History and Tradition

As that old saying goes “Everyone is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day“. Saint Patrick’s Day is one of the most popular Irish holidays celebrated world wide by the Irish and non Irish a like. Saint Patrick’s Day is actually the Feast day of Ireland’s patron saint known as Saint Patrick (Irish: Lá Fhéile Pádraig, also widely known as “the Day of the Festival of Patrick”). St. Patrick’s Day for the Irish is a popular cultural celebration as well as a religious celebration held on 17 March.  The feast day of St. Patrick is the traditional death date of Saint Patrick (c. AD 385–461). Saint Patrick is the foremost patron saint of Ireland.

Who was Saint Patrick? 

Saint Patrick was a Christian missionary and is regarded as the patron saint of Ireland. St. Patrick lived from AD 373–493, and ministered mostly in Northern Ireland from AD 433 until his death. Irish legend credits Patrick with banishing snakes from the island of Ireland although Ireland never actually had snakes. Let’s just chalk that up to some poetic license. It has however been suggested that snakes referred to the serpent symbolism of the pagans also called the Druids. Saint Patrick is also credited with teaching the Irish about the Holy Trinity by showing people the shamrock and a three-leaved clover. Legend also says St. Patrick, while preaching Christianity, drew a cross through a Celtic circle symbolic of the moon Goddess. Hence the Celtic cross was born. Today the circle of the cross is viewed as a of God’s endless love.

New York City’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Irish-American immigrants brought Saint Patrick’s Day to the United States. The first civic and public celebration of Saint Patrick’s Day took place in Boston, Massachusetts in 1737. The first celebration of Saint Patrick’s Day in New York City was held at the Crown and Thistle Tavern in 1756. Saint Patrick’s Day is celebrated by Irish and non-Irish alike. Regardless of ethnic background, everyone wears green-colored clothing and items. Traditionally, those who are caught not wearing green are pinched. The NYC St. Patrick’s Day parade has become the largest Saint Patrick’s Day parade in the world, outside Ireland. In 2006 more than 150,000 marchers participated in it, including Irish bands, Irish firefighters, Irish military and Irish police groups, county associations, Irish emigrant societies, Emerald Societies, and social and Irish cultural clubs, and it was watched by close to two million spectators lining the streets.

Why do we wear green on St Patrick’s Day?

Old Irish folklore says that wearing green makes one invisible to mischievous creatures like leprechauns, fairies who pinch those not wearing the green.  As a matter of superstition people began pinching anyone not wear green as a reminder that leprechauns were lurking about.

The origin of the “wearing of the green” dress code for St Patrick’s Day dates can be dated to the 1798 Irish Rebellion, the major uprising against the British in Ireland. It was during this rebellion when the shamrock, a three leaf clover became a symbol of Irish nationalism.

Today many people adorn themselves with lucky shamrock jewelry on St. Patrick’s Day. Saint Patrick’s Day jewelry such as Shamrock jewelry including shamrock earrings, and an Irish necklace like a shamrock necklace makes the perfect Irish accessory for the festive holiday.

Another symbol of Irish pride worn on St. Patrick’s Day is the Irish Harp. Irish harps are worn as Irish harp brooches and Irish harp necklaces. The Irish harp, although not as renowned as the shamrock is the official emblem of Ireland. The Irish harps status as the official insignia of Ireland dates centuries and the elegant instrument’s history tells much about the history of the Emerald Isle.

Irish Recipes, St. Patricks Day

Irish Soda Bread Recipe

Irish Soda Bread

This Irish soda bread makes a great breakfast treat. Or omit the raisins and sugar, and add caraway seeds for bread that’s perfect for dinner.

Traditional Irish Soda Bread
Traditional Irish Soda Bread

(we prefer the raisins)

Ingredients

3 cups all-purpose flour
1½ teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons sugar
1½ cups 1% buttermilk
⅔ cup raisins

Preparation

Preheat oven to 375.
Whisk dry ingredients in a large bowl. Slowly add buttermilk, stirring until a soft dough is formed.
Add raisins, and lightly knead the dough on a floured surface for about a minute. Form into a round, slightly flattened shape.
Place dough on a cookie sheet covered with parchment paper.
Using a sharp knife, make an “x” on the top of the dough, about ½-inch deep. Bake until golden brown, about 40 minutes.

Irish Traditions, St. Patricks Day

NYC St. Patrick’s Day Parade History

St. Patrick’s Day (Irish: Lá ‘le Pádraig or Lá Fhéile Pádraig), colloquially, but to some a derogatory term, St. Paddy’s Day is the feast day that celebrates Saint Patrick.St.Patrick

St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated on March 17. People celebrate St. Patrick’s Day by wearing green and going to Saint Patrick’s Day parades.

Irish-American immigrants brought Saint Patrick’s Day to the United States. The first civic and public celebration of Saint Patrick’s Day took place in Boston, Massachusetts in 1737. The first celebration of Saint Patrick’s Day in New York City was held at the Crown and Thistle Tavern in 1756. Saint Patrick’s Day is celebrated by Irish and non-Irish alike. Regardless of ethnic background, everyone wears green-colored clothing and items. Traditionally, those who are caught not wearing green are pinched. The NYC St. Patrick’s Day parade has become the largest Saint Patrick’s Day parade in the world, outside Ireland. In 2006 more than 150,000 marchers participated in it, including Irish bands, Irish firefighters, Irish military and Irish police groups, county associations, Irish emigrant societies, Emerald Societies, and social and Irish cultural clubs, and it was watched by close to two million spectators lining the streets.

Interesting Stories, News, St. Patricks Day

Irish-American Heritage Month (March) and St. Patrick’s Day (March 17)

Originally a religious holiday to honor St. Patrick, who introduced Christianity to Ireland in the fifth century, St. Patrick’s Day has evolved into a celebration for all things Irish. The world’s first St. Patrick’s Day parade occurred on March 17, 1762, in New York City, featuring Irish soldiers serving in the English military. This parade became an annual event, with President Truman attending in 1948. Congress proclaimed March as Irish-American Heritage Month in 1995, and the President issues a proclamation commemorating the occasion each year.

Sports Celebration of Irish Heritage

100,003
Population of South Bend, Ind., home to the Fighting Irish of the University of Notre Dame. About 10.4 percent of South Bend’s population claims Irish ancestry.

Percentage of the Boston metropolitan area population that claims Irish ancestry, one of the highest percentages for the top 50 metro areas by population. Boston is home of the Celtics of the National Basketball Association.

78,390 and 16,167

Population of New Rochelle, N.Y., and Moraga, Calif., home to the Gaels of Iona University and St. Mary’s College of California, respectively. During college basketball’s March Madness, you will typically see these universities compete on the court, no doubt rooted on by some of the 8.4 percent of the New Rochelle population and 15.5 percent of the Moraga population that claim Irish ancestry.

Population Distribution
34.1 million

Number of U.S. residents who claimed Irish ancestry in 2012. This number was more than seven times the population of Ireland itself (4.6 million). Irish was the nation’s second most frequently reported ancestry, trailing only German.

22.6%

Percentage of the population in Massachusetts that claims Irish ancestry, which is among the highest in the nation. New York has 2.5 million people claiming Irish ancestry, which is among the most of any state.

153,248

Number of people with Irish ancestry who were naturalized citizens in 2012.

39.2 years old

Median age of those who claim Irish ancestry, which is higher than U.S. residents as a whole at 37.4 years.

Irish-Americans Today
34.2%

Percentage of people of Irish ancestry, 25 or older, who had a bachelor’s degree or higher. In addition, 93.4 percent of Irish-Americans in this age group had at least a high school diploma. For the nation as a whole, the corresponding rates were 29.1 percent and 86.4 percent, respectively.

$59,220

Median income for households headed by an Irish-American, higher than the $51,371 for all households. In addition, 7.4 percent of family households of Irish ancestry were in poverty, lower than the rate of 11.8 percent for all Americans.

41.1%

Percentage of employed civilian Irish-Americans 16 or older who worked in management, professional and related occupations. Additionally, 25.9 percent worked in sales and office occupations; 15.9 percent in service occupations; 9.3 percent in production, transportation and material moving occupations; and 7.7 percent in natural resources, construction and maintenance occupations.

68.9%

Percentage of householders of Irish ancestry who owned the home in which they live, with the remainder renting. For the nation as a whole, the homeownership rate was 63.9 percent.

Places to Spend the Day
16

Number of places in the United States that share the name of Ireland’s capital, Dublin. The most recent population for Dublin, Calif., was 47,156.

If you’re still not into the spirit of St. Paddy’s Day, then you might consider paying a visit to Emerald Isle, N.C., with 3,669 residents.

Other appropriate places in which to spend the day: the township of Irishtown, Ill., several places or townships named Clover (in South Carolina, Illinois, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin) or one of the seven places that are named Shamrock.

The Celebration
25.9 billion

U.S. beef production in pounds in 2012. Corned beef is a traditional St. Patrick’s Day dish.

$21.5 million

Value of potted florist chrysanthemum sales at wholesale in 2012 for operations with $100,000 or more sales. Lime green chrysanthemums are often requested for St. Patrick’s Day celebrations.

The following is a list of observances typically covered by the Census Bureau’s Facts for Features series:
African-American History Month (February)
Super Bowl
Valentine’s Day (Feb. 14)
Women’s History Month (March)
Irish-American Heritage Month (March)/
St. Patrick’s Day (March 17)
Earth Day (April 22)
Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month (May)
Older Americans Month (May)
Cinco de Mayo (May 5)
Mother’s Day
Hurricane Season Begins (June 1)
Father’s Day The Fourth of July (July 4)
Anniversary of Americans With Disabilities Act (July 26)
Back to School (August)
Labor Day
Grandparents Day
Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15-Oct. 15)
Unmarried and Single Americans Week
Halloween (Oct. 31)
American Indian/Alaska Native Heritage Month (November)
Veterans Day (Nov. 11)
Thanksgiving Day
The Holiday Season (December)

Editor’s note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error. Facts for Features are customarily released about two months before an observance in order to accommodate magazine production timelines. Questions or comments should be directed to the Census Bureau’s Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; fax: 301-763-3762; or e-mail: <PIO@census.gov>.1-main

Celtic Legends, Irish Traditions, St. Patricks Day

The Meaning of the Shamrock

The shamrock is most common 3-leaf clover native to the beautiful Emerald Isle. The majestic shamrock was chosen as the national symbol of Ireland because Saint Patrick used the 3 leafed clover to teach the Holy Trinity to the pagan Celts. The Celts understood the significance of the shamrock forming a triad because they believed three was a mystical number. The Trinity or Trinity Knot is the idea that God is really three-in-one: The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit.

The word shamrock can be traced back to the Irish word seamróg or seamair óg, meaning “little clover”. The tradition of wearing a Shamrock on Saint Patrick’s Day can be traced back to the early 1700s. The Irish have long considered shamrocks as good-luck symbols and today people of many other nationalities also believe they bring good luck. In Ireland shamrocks are traditionally worn at weddings for good luck. Often tucked in a bouquet or used as filler with a boutineer.

Maybe good things really do come in three?

SHAMROCK BLESSING NECKLACE2

There is an old Irish Blessing….

For each petal on the shamrock this brings a wish your way. Good health, good luck, and happiness for today and every day.

Shamrock Necklaces

Shamrock necklaces, inspired by Ireland’s national symbol. Get the Luck of the Irish with a traditional shamrock pendant! The shamrock is believed to bring good luck. and not just to the Irish.

Irish Blessings, St. Patricks Day

An Irish Blessing and Sayings for Saint Patrick’s Day

 

Irish Blessing for Saint Patrick’s Day

May the leprechauns be near you,
To spread luck along your way.
And may all the Irish angels,
Smile upon you on St. Patrick’s Day.

May your thoughts be as glad as the shamrocks. May your heart be as light as a song. May each day bring you bright, happy hours that stay with you all the year long.

May your troubles be less and your blessings be more. And nothing but happiness come through your door.

May St. Patrick guard you wherever you go, and guide you in whatever you do – and may his loving protection be a blessing to you always.

Irish Sayings for Saint Patrick’s Day

Oh, Paddy, dear, an’ did ye hear the news that’s goin’ round?
The shamrock is forbid by law to grow on Irish ground!
No more St. Patrick’s Day we’ll keep, his color can’t be seen,
For there’s a cruel law agin’ the Wearin’ o’ the green.

Irish Toasts for St. Patrick’s Day

Here is a toast to a long life and a journey as wonderful as you are. Have a Happy St. Patrick’s feast!

Here’s to you and yours and to mine and ours. And if mine and ours ever come across to you and yours, I hope you and yours will do as much for mine and ours as mine and ours have done for you and yours!

Here’s to me, and here’s to you. And here’s to love and laughter. I’ll be true as long as you. And not one moment after.

Shop for all your Saint Patrick’s Day Gifts like Irish Jewelry, including Shamrock Necklaces and Claddagh Rings at The Irish Jewelry Company

About us: The Irish Jewelry Company was founded by award-winning designer Jennifer Derrig.  The Irish Jewelry Company collection offers classic and contemporary Irish Jewelry including Claddagh rings, all handcrafted.

Explore The Irish Jewelry Company Claddagh ring collection today and start your own Irish tradition today.

Irish Traditions, St. Patricks Day

It’s All About Saint Patrick’s Day

This Erin Go Bragh necklace is a true Irish charmer.
This Erin Go Bragh necklace is a true Irish charmer.

St. Patrick’s Day (Irish: Lá ‘le Pádraig or Lá Fhéile Pádraig), colloquially, but to some a derogatory term, St. Paddy’s Day is the feast day that celebrates Saint Patrick.
St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated on March 17. People celebrate St. Patrick’s Day by wearing green and going to Saint Patrick’s Day parades. Irish-American immigrants brought Saint Patrick’s Day to the United States. The first civic and public celebration of Saint Patrick’s Day took place in Boston, Massachusetts in 1737. The first celebration of Saint Patrick’s Day in New York City was held at the Crown and Thistle Tavern in 1756. Saint Patrick’s Day is celebrated by Irish and non-Irish alike. Regardless of ethnic background, everyone wears green-colored clothing and items. Traditionally, those who are caught not wearing green are pinched. The NYC St. Patrick’s Day parade has become the largest Saint Patrick’s Day parade in the world, outside Ireland. In 2006 more than 150,000 marchers participated in it, including Irish bands, Irish firefighters, Irish military and Irish police groups, county associations, Irish emigrant societies, Emerald Societies, and social and Irish cultural clubs, and it was watched by close to two million spectators lining the streets.