Celtic Jewelry, Irish Jewelry, St. Patricks Day

Celtic Crosses of Ireland

Stone Crosses in Ireland

The Celtic cross is a variant of the Christian cross that first appeared in Ireland, France, and Great Britain during the Early Middle Ages. It is distinguished by the presence of a nimbus or ring.

Celtic Cross with Circle Meaning

The structure of a Celtic Cross consists of a conventional cross with a circle placed at the point where the arms of the cross meet the stem of the cross. They regard the circle as a representation of eternity. This highlights the unending, unchanging love that God has for all of us, as seen through the sacrifice that Jesus made on the cross for our sins.

Even while it is widely recognized as a Christian symbol, the Celtic Cross also has deep ties to ancient pagan beliefs that predate Christianity.

Stone Crosses of Ireland

Wood and metal were likely used in the construction of the first crosses in Ireland, and these early crosses were likely considerably smaller than the massive stone crosses that are seen today.

A high cross, often known as a standing cross, is a type of Christian cross that is free-standing and typically built of stone. Stonemasons who were competent in their trade and who lived and worked in monasteries would have been responsible for the construction of high crosses.

The Celtic High Cross

The High Cross of the Celts is without a doubt one of the most well-known symbols associated with Ireland. The presence of tall crosses throughout Ireland’s landscape has come to be seen as a representation of the country’s long and storied history.

Celtic High Crosses are a type of religious Irish sculpture that were unparalleled in the culture of Western Europe throughout the Middle Ages. These crosses may be found all across the island of Ireland.

The crosses at Kells, Clonmacnoise, and Monasterboice reveal a cooperation between the church and some of the most powerful individuals of early medieval Ireland in the formation of Ireland’s most renowned stone memorial. These crosses portray the legacies of some of the most influential religious authorities, kings, and aristocracy of medieval Ireland.

The Symbolism Behind the Celtic Cross

The meaning of the Celtic Cross may be interpreted in a variety of ways; however, it is most commonly seen of as a symbol of resilience and compassion, in addition to being a metaphor for the highs and lows that are inevitable in life.
These Celtic Irish crosses have four arms that are meant to represent the four elements of nature: fire, earth, water, and air. However, these arms may also be interpreted as representing the heart, body, soul, and mind.

The circle in the center of the Celtic Cross is meant to represent infinite love, which is love that does not have a beginning or an end but continues on forever.
Additionally, it represents the halo that Christ wears, which bestows unending love on the person who wears it. This renowned piece of Celtic jewelry was created over the course of many years by skilled artisans who, across several generations, worked tirelessly to develop a symbol that was meant to represent the aspirations and ideals of the Celts.

Celtic Cross Jewelry

The ancient stone crosses that have been erected to designate religious sites throughout Ireland serve as an inspiration for the jewelry collections known as Celtic Cross.
The Celtic Cross Necklace is an excellent example of Celtic jewelry and a true reflection of Celtic culture. The Irish Jewelry Company has created one-of-a-kind Celtic Crosses out of a range of metals, and they have embellished each of the cross’s four arms with a number of Irish symbols, including the Celtic knot and others. These crosses are available for purchase on the company’s website.

Interesting Stories, Ireland, Irish Traditions, St. Patricks Day, Travel Ireland

Learn All About Irish Dance and Step Dancing

Learn All About Irish Dance and Step Dancing

Irish Traditions , Interesting Stories , Education

stepdancing , set dance , learn all about irish dance and step dancing , irish dance , ceili

There are a variety of styles of Irish dancing, such as Irish Stepdancing, Ceili Dancing as well as Irish Set Dancing and this post will attempt to cover all of them in detail while also providing you with a wide variety of additional dance information.

The Irish culture places a significant emphasis on Irish dancing as an art form. The unusual footwork is fascinating to onlookers from other cultures, and they frequently express their delight in seeing it. The television show Riverdance is principally responsible for the widespread popularity of Irish dance that has developed over the past twenty years. However, traditional Irish dances date back hundreds of years older than that. Continue reading to find out more about this fantastic method of artistic expression!

It is thought that Irish stepdancing developed about 2,000 years ago from dances that were performed by Celtic druids in celebration of oak trees and the sun. These dances were believed to have originated in Ireland.Before the arrival of Christianity and other outside influences, the Celts and the druids who wandered the island were responsible for the development of Irish dance. These origins may be traced back to ancient times. Dancing was an important part of many of the religious rites that the Druids performed, and it was typically done in a ring around the holy trees. The Celts had their own traditional dances, which included patterns quite similar to those of the Irish. It was in 1689 when the Irish rinnce fada, which literally translates to “the long dance,” was documented for the first time. At the time, it was performed in celebration of James II’s arrival in Ireland.

But why do Irish dance schools all around the world continue to teach step dancing with their arms held straight out in front of them?

The fact of the matter is that nobody knows for certain how this age-old and one-of-a-kind kind of dance developed; nonetheless, we can have a look at some of the hypotheses that attempt to explain its origins below. One possible justification for this behavior is that it was a kind of protest on the part of Irish dancers who were compelled to perform for Queen Elizabeth I, the person who was ultimately responsible for the establishment of plantations in Ireland. According to the legend, the Queen of England once requested a performance from a troop of Irish dancers. These dancers had no choice but to refuse to extend their arms to her since they had no other option.

They kept them tightly at their sides while they danced as an act of defiance, and maybe to show their fellow countrymen that they were not enjoying themselves when they danced for Queen and the English. This is a distinct possibility given that Irish jigs were a favorite of Queen Elizabeth I’s court and that it is documented that “dances of Irish provenance” were performed there on a regular basis.

What is Ceili Dancing?

Céili dances, (pronounced “kay-lee) sometimes known as authentic éili dances, are one of the most common types of Irish folk dancing. The origins of ceili dance may be traced back several centuries, all the way to the beginning of the 1500s. It is a traditional dance that involves more than two partners. Each pair dances with one another in addition to dancing with the group, and they frequently switch partners with one another. The stretched arms and pointed toes are two characteristics that stand out prominently in ceili dance. The heys, round dances, long dances, and quadrilles that form the basis of Céil dances were largely resurrected during the Gaelic revival in the first part of the twentieth century and standardized by the Irish Dancing Commission. Céil dances are also known as ceilidhs.

What are Irish Set Dances?

The Irish set dance, sometimes referred to as “country sets,” is a well-liked style of the country’s traditional folk dancing. The quadrille, a popular court dance, was changed into set dancing so that it could be performed in rural regions. In a common configuration, it calls for four couples to be positioned in a square. The next step is for four couples at a time to make their way through the square and switch positions. In contrast to ceili, the dancers use the most of the flat section of their feet throughout the majority of the dance, with the exception of a few low kicks and flourishes.

What is Irish Stepdance?

The origins of Irish stepdance may be traced back to traditional Irish dance. Irish stepdance is a type of performance dancing. In general, it is distinguished by a rigid upper body as well as rapid and accurate motions of the feet. The Irish dance known as stepdance can be done either by an individual or by a group. Although it is sometimes danced in pairs, it is not necessary to do so in order to participate. Stepdancing requires the dancers to maintain a stiff upper body. This stands in stark contrast to the movement of their feet and legs, which consists of a series of very quick hops, high kicks, and intricate footwork.

Riverdance Introduced Irish Dance to the World

There is no such thing as an Irish dancing style known as Riverdance. Instead, it is the name of a professional stage production that incorporates vast numbers of setdancers who earn their living in the industry. The audience will be told Irish tales via the use of dance, music, and light during the presentation. Despite having its beginnings in Ireland, the act is now performed all over the world. Riverdance is a stage production that focuses mostly on the music and dance styles that are common in Ireland. It was originally conceived as an interval performance act at the 1994 Eurovision Song Contest and included Irish dance champions Jean Butler and Michael Flatley in addition to the vocal group Anna. Bill Whelan was responsible for the composition of the show’s soundtrack.

Celtic Legends, Halloween, Interesting Stories

The Irish Legend of the Banshee

The Irish Legend of the Banshee

The image that comes to most people’s minds when they hear the word “banshee” is that of a floating ghostly figure that wails and is in general quite terrifying. You might also be familiar with the age-old concept that banshees are considered to be portents of impending death. The whole account of the Banshee may be found here.

220px-Banshee

The Banshee, pronounced bean-sidhe is the woman of the fairies and maybe an ancestral spirit appointed to forewarn members of certain ancient Irish families of their time of death. According to tradition, the banshee can only cry for five major Irish families: the O’Neills, the O’Briens, the O’Connors, the O’Gradys and the Kavanaghs. Intermarriage has since extended this select list.
Whatever her origins, the banshee chiefly appears in one of three guises: a young woman, a stately matron or a raddled old hag. These represent the triple aspects of the Celtic goddess of war and death, namely Badhbh, Macha and Mor-Rioghain.) She usually wears either a grey, hooded cloak or the winding sheet or grave robe of the unshriven dead. She may also appear as a washer-woman, and is seen apparently washing the blood stained clothes of those who are about to die. In this guise she is known as the bean-nighe (washing woman).
Although not always seen, her mourning call is heard, usually at night when someone is about to die.

Irish families of their time of death. According to tradition, the banshee can only cry for five major Irish families: the O’Neills, the O’Briens, the O’Connors, the O’Gradys and the Kavanaghs. Intermarriage has since extended this select list.
Whatever her origins, the banshee chiefly appears in one of three guises: a young woman, a stately matron or a raddled old hag. These represent the triple aspects of the Celtic goddess of war and death, namely Badhbh, Macha and Mor-Rioghain.) She usually wears either a grey, hooded cloak or the winding sheet or grave robe of the unshriven dead. She may also appear as a washer-woman, and is seen apparently washing the blood stained clothes of those who are about to die. In this guise she is known as the bean-nighe (washing woman).
Although not always seen, her mourning call is heard, usually at night when someone is about to die.

A banshee is a spirit that does not have a physical body and can take any one of the following forms:

A stunning woman who was wrapped in a shroud.
A slender woman with a white outfit, long red hair, and a red lipstick.
A woman who is silver-haired and wears a long garment of silver.
A headless lady who is completely nude from the waist up and is carrying a dish of blood.
An elderly lady with eerie red eyes, a green outfit, and long white hair was standing there.
A geriatric lady who was clothed entirely in black and had long, gray hair. She wore a veil over her face.

Origins of the Banshee Folklore

According to historians, the first accounts of the Irish Banshee date back to the eighth century and were based on a ritual in which ladies sung a mournful song to express their condolences over the passing of a loved one. These ladies were known as “keeners,” and because they took alcoholic beverages as payment, they were considered to be sinners. As a result, they were condemned to a life as banshees as their punishment. It is said that if a Banshee is seen, she would quickly disappear into a cloud of mist while making a sound that is comparable to the sound of a bird flapping its wings. This is a part of the legend surrounding the Banshee. According to urban legend, banshees do not bring about death; rather, they just serve as a warning of impending doom.

Banshees Are Both Good and Bad 

There are a few banshees that had deep links to their family in life and remained to look after them after death. These banshees are the exception to the rule that banshees are monsters filled with hatred. When they make their appearance, these Banshees take the form of beautiful, entrancing ladies who perform a mournful, eerie song that is full of care and love for their family. This song can be heard a few days before a member of the family passes away, and in the vast majority of instances, the song can only be heard by the individual for whom it was written.

On the other hand, there is the Banshee, a terrifying creature that most of us are familiar with. She is furious and terrifying. These ladies, throughout the course of their lives, had reasons to despise their family, and now they emerge as grotesque and terrifying apparitions that are full with animosity. The howls that are coming from these banshees are enough to give you the chills all the way down to your bones, and rather than appearing to warn a member of the family, these banshees are rejoicing in the impending death of someone who they despised.

Irish Legends, St. Patricks Day, Travel Ireland

The Legend of the Irish Leprechaun

Leprechaun at night

The legend of the Leprechaun is one of the most famous stories in Ireland, and it refers to a magical kind of fairy that is initially tied to the Tuatha De Danann of Irish mythology. The Leprechaun is said to have been one of the first people to bring gold to Ireland.

Leprechauns are described in folklore as being little beings that often take the shape of an elderly gentleman dressed in a green or red cloak. They are known to be naughty little creatures who like to create shoes and save their gold money in a pot of gold that is buried at the end of a rainbow. You may find that precious pot of gold at the end of a rainbow but if you manage to catch a leprechaun, he will grant you three wishes as long as you set him free at the end of the day.

The Origin of the Leprechaun

The majority of tales concerning leprechauns may be traced back to accounts of water spirits from the eighth century that were referred to as “luchorpán,” which means “little body.” It is stated that these spirits fused with a house fairy and gained a taste for binge drinking as a result; hence, no basement was immune from their influence. According to the findings of other experts, the name “leprechaun” originates from the Irish word “leath brogan,” which may be translated as “shoemaker.”

It is interesting to notice that leprechauns are commonly linked with riches, namely gold coins. However, in reality, leprechauns are cobblers, which is not a profession that one would typically consider to be profitable. Despite this, the legend of the pot of gold lives on, and there are still some who try to find the long-lost treasure.

Pot with gold coins, hat and clover on green grass, space for text. St. Patrick’s Day celebration

The Leprechaun’s Pot of Gold

The story that leprechauns dig up pots full of gold money and hide them at the end of a rainbow is the one that is told the most often. According to this version of the legend, leprechauns locate gold coins buried in the ground and put them all in a pot. It’s better for the plot if you just ignore the fact that a rainbow doesn’t really start or stop anywhere specific.

Why leprechauns actually require gold is a very different question, given that they are unable to really spend it in any way. It has been hypothesized by some researchers that this gold is employed by leprechauns as a ruse to deceive people. Considering the Leprechauns’ fondness for pranks, this is not an implausible hypothesis at all.

In the majority of the Irish folktales that feature the Leprechaun, he is portrayed as a scoundrel who would trick people whenever he has the chance. When people do manage to trap leprechauns in stories, they are easily tricked by the magical creature since leprechauns typically take use of a person’s greed as a weapon against them. Even if you think you know everything there is to know about leprechauns, you might be surprised to learn some of the mysterious trickster’s background details.

Leprechauns in Popular Culture Today

The concept of leprechauns has been modernized, and the mythology itself now functions as something of a tourist attraction that brings a significant number of visitors from the United States, in particular, to Ireland. The image of the leprechaun has become so popular in the United States that it is used as the mascot for Notre Dame University and as the logo for Lucky Charms cereal. Of course, not everything having to do with leprechauns is amusing or especially classy, as seen by the dreadful leprechaun movies starring Warwick Davis. One example of this may be found in the previous sentence.
It is safe to assume that a sizable number of Irish people are aggravated by the negative racial stereotypes that are associated with leprechauns, however the folklore surrounding leprechauns does include a lesson that can be drawn from it. People should heed the warning and avoid participating in any “get rich fast” scams since it is common practice for them to con those who are looking for a pot of gold.

In addition, you shouldn’t try to grab what isn’t yours, and you shouldn’t meddle with things that are above your level of comprehension. In the end, we shouldn’t take the stories of the leprechaun too seriously; instead, we should let them entertain and pleasure us.

Leprechaun Facts

Did you know Leprechauns were first depicted as wearing red?

In popular culture, a Leprechaun is often portrayed as a guy who is dressed in all green at all times. Leprechauns, on the other hand, are depicted in Irish legend as men who dress in red and wear hats with three points at the top. In his book titled Legends and Stories of Ireland, which was published in 1831, Irish author Samuel Lover refers to leprechauns in this manner.

Did you know there are no female leprechauns?

The book “A History of Irish Fairies” written by Carolyn White claims that there is no evidence of any female Leprechauns ever having existed. This, of course, indicates that leprechauns defy the conventional rules of biology by virtue of the fact that they are still there, and there is no evidence that tells the tale of how they reproduce. According to the aforementioned text, Irish leprechauns are essentially the twisted offspring of fairies.

Did you know there is a town in County Louth that does a yearly Leprechaun search?

In spite of the fact that the Leprechaun is said to have been there for well over a thousand years, the most recent alleged sighting took place near 1989 in Carlingford, County Louth, and was reported by a bar owner named P.J. O’Hare. O’Hare claims that he was able to hear cries coming from a well and that he discovered the bones and clothes of a leprechaun, which are now on display at his tavern. The community currently has a Leprechaun search on an annual basis, with the goal being to locate plastic replicas of the legendary monster.

Did you know that under European Union legislation leprechauns are considered to be a protected species?

The Sliabh Foy Loop route near Carlingford has been designated as an official protected area for the 236 leprechauns who are believed to reside in Ireland. Local lobbyists, one of whom is Kevin Woods, a native of Carlingford, were successful in their efforts to persuade the European Union to safeguard the region, and as a result, it is now covered by the European Habitats Directive.

Celtic Holidays, Interesting Stories, News, Travel Ireland

Summer in Ireland Traveling the Emerald Isle

Peaceful Cottage Ireland

Even though the first day of summer does not arrive until June 1st with the summer solstice on June 21st, ancient Celts believed that the month of May, which they celebrated as Lá Bealtaine, marked the beginning of summer. And who wouldn’t welcome the arrival of summer a little bit earlier? Continue reading to learn more about this ancient Celtic festival and the rituals that are still practiced in Ireland to this very day.

Bringing the sun back to life

Bealtaine, which occurs at the beginning of May, is a celebration of the “rekindling” of the sun and the transition to longer days and shorter nights. This holiday falls approximately halfway between the spring equinox and the summer solstice. Along with Imbolc (Spring), Lnasa (Autumn), and Samhain (Winter), it was one of the four most important seasonal feasts celebrated in Celtic Ireland (Winter).

The celebration of Bealtaine may be traced back thousands of years to Uisneach, a hill located in the symbolic heart of Ireland. It is said that the goddess Ériu, who is credited with naming Ireland, sits on this hill. It is said that the kings of the Celtic people would marry Ériu in a ceremony and then light a large fire on top of this significant location to ensure a prosperous summer. This would bind the kings’ destinies to the land. Other large Bealtaine bonfires were started from it, and locals lit their own hearth fires from them. It was visible from nearly a fourth of the island of Ireland.

May Day in Ireland

May Day has been celebrated in Ireland since pagan times as the feast of Bealtaine and in latter times as Mary’s day. Traditionally, bonfires were lit to mark the coming of summer and to banish the long nights of winter. Officially Irish May Day holiday is the first Monday in May. Old traditions such as bonfires are no longer widely observed, though the practice persists in some places across the country. Limerick, Clare and many other people in other counties still keep on this tradition such as the town of Arklow in Co. Wicklow.

Happy Summer Solstice!

In Ireland, Midsummer or the summer solstice takes places on 21st June. This is the longest day of the year when the sun reaches its highest position in the sky in the Northern Hemisphere. The celebration of Summer Solstice in Ireland is tied to their ancient landmarks and Neolithic sites such as Newgrange that dates back to 5,000 years ago. Also in Co. Meath, is the Hill of Tara which has deep links to Irish folklore and is a popular location to celebrate the solstice.

Summer Holidays in Ireland

And all-around Ireland, plenty of people will take advantage of the long May bank holiday weekend to wind down and relax, and perhaps, like their Celtic predecessors, have some fun with family and friends to get the summer season started off right.

Celtic Holidays, Celtic Jewelry, Irish Jewelry, Irish Traditions, Irish Wit & Wisdom, St. Patricks Day

7 Interesting Facts About St. Patrick and St. Patrick’s Day

St. Patrick’s Day commemorates the feast day of St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, as observed by the Roman Catholic Church. St. Patrick passed away on March 17, 461 in Ireland. You may not have realized it, but he wasn’t even Irish. Here are some interesting facts about St. Patrick, as well as some history about his feast day.

Saint Patrick wasn’t Irish

Patrick’s given name was Maewyn when he was born. He was born in the Roman Empire in Britain. At the tender age of 16, he was abducted and sold into slavery in Africa, before being transported to Ireland.

Saint Patrick was a Slave

His flight resulted in his conversion to Christianity in a monastery in Gaul (France). In 432, he returned to Ireland to serve as a missionary. While Christianity had already gained a foothold in the nation, legend has it that Patrick faced the Druids in Tara and forced them to abandon their pagan practices, so spreading Christianity even farther.

Saint Patrick is the patron Saint of Ireland

Saint Patrick rose to the position of bishop and, upon his death, was designated as Ireland’s patron saint. The festivities in Ireland, on the other hand, were subdued. In fact Saint Patrick’s Day was a dry holiday.

Saint Patrick’s Day Parades started in America

When the Irish immigrated to the United States, they established the larger festivities and parades that are still celebrated today. The earliest St. Patrick’s Day parades were staged in the eighteenth century by Irish troops who had served in the Revolutionary War. After emigrating to the United States, the festivities became a means for the Irish to reconnect with their heritage. Interesting tidbits:

The Shamrock is a Symbol of St. Patrick

According to tradition, St. Patrick used the three leaf clover (also known as the shamrock) to teach the Trinity or the Holy Trinity to the people of Ireland.

Coloring the River Green

The practice of dyeing the river green began in 1962 when municipal authorities in Chicago chose to color a part of the Chicago River green.

The Origins of Corn Beef and Cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day

Corn beef and cabbage is an Irish-American meal that remains popular today. Certain meals were out of reach for Irish Americans or Irish Immigrants since they were so impoverished. Their only option for St. Patrick’s Day dinner was beef and cabbage, which they couldn’t afford. It quickly become a tradition during the occasion. The meal originated on American soil in the late 19th century as Irish immigrants substituted corned beef for bacon, which was meat of choice in the homeland.

Celtic Holidays, Celtic Jewelry, Irish Jewelry, Irish Traditions, St. Patricks Day

Shamrocks are a St. Patrick’s Day Symbol

As we near the magical Irish celebration of St. Patrick’s Day, it is important to get all your ducks, I mean shamrocks in a row. Because it’s literally time to get your green on folks.

The month of March for many of us has come to mean adorable little leprechaun figurines, delicious fast food minty milkshakes, and festive shamrock house flags are just a few of the Saint Patrick’s Day decorating traditions that are becoming increasingly popular. Not to mention the Irish themed apparel and St. Patrick’s Day jewelry accessories for the holiday. I mean who doesn’t love some Irish jewelry like a great pair of Shamrock Earrings or a sassy Lil’ Irish Devil Shamrock Necklace guaranteed to grab some attention at the party or pub.

But have you ever sat down and pondered why shamrocks? Why are shamrocks associated with St. Patrick’s Day? Are Shamrocks as lucky as four-leaf clovers are?

Despite the fact that many of us have been seeing shamrocks or clovers in our backyards and sidewalks or have made some related shamrock craft since childhood during the month of March for St. Patrick’s Day we dont know why? Many have spent their whole lives without giving shamrock meaning much thought, and dont know the origins of the shamrock. So here’s the truth on shamrocks and Saint Patrick’s Day.

What exactly are shamrocks?

Shamrocks are a three-leaf clover, a very common version of the clover. As a matter of fact, the name “shamrock” derives from the Irish word “seamróg,”. The Irish word seamróg, which is the diminutive of the Irish word seamair óg and simply means “young clover”. The only difference between a shamrock and a four-leaf clover is that one leaf is missing from the latter. Four-leaf clovers, on the other hand, are very unusual, with just one in every 10,000 clovers having four leaves. So if you happen to come upon one, you’re considered lucky.

It is said that shamrocks represent St. Patrick’s Day because St. Patrick was a Christian missionary who used a clover to teach the Holy Trinity of Christianity, which is composed of three persons: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit (also known as the trinity of God). He said that the three leaves represent the three divine entities, and that the stem represents the way in which they are unified into one.

The shamrock was also adopted as an emblem of St. Patrick, who was eventually designated as the patron saint of Ireland. As part of their celebration of St. Patrick’s Day in 1681, people began pinning a shamrock to their clothing, a practice that has survived to this day – not only in Ireland, but throughout the whole world. And, because shamrocks are green, people ultimately began to dress in green on St. Patrick’s Day to celebrate the holiday.

Celtic Jewelry, Irish Jewelry, Irish Traditions, St. Valentine's Day

Learn to Say ‘I Love You’ in Irish Gaelic

So, how do you say “I love you” in Irish? A word-for-word translation is not the most practical method of expressing your affection. Learning a few words and phrases rather than translating them is a lot simpler and more efficient method.

It may take some time to master the Irish pronunciation of the phrase “I love you.”
It’s possible to modify the sound of Irish letters by the letters adjacent to them, since many letters in the language are silent. The good news is that each sentence is followed by an explanation of how to pronounce it.

5 Common Ways to Say ‘I Love You’ in Irish

  • Is tú mo grá (pronounced Is too moh graw) – This translates as ‘you are my love’ Word for word, it is ‘are you my love,’ but it is not a question. Irish puts the verb first in the sentence.
  • grá agam duit (pronounced taw graw agum dweet) – The exact meaning of this phrase is ‘I have love for you.’ Gra is the Irish word for love.
  • Tá mo chroí istigh ionat (pronounced taw moh kree ish-tig un-at) – This very romantic phrase literally means ‘my heart is in you’.
  • Is tú mo chuisle (pronounced is too moh coosh-lah) – Another anatomical phrase, this means ‘you are my pulse’. Fans of the film ‘Million Dollar Baby’ might remember the phrase ‘mo chuisle’ from the movie.
  • Táim i ngrá leat (pronounced tame ee n-graw leat. Leat rhymes with eat) – This one means ‘I am in love with you.’
  • Mo ghrá (moh graw) – my love
  • Mo chroí (moh kree)– my heart or Is tú mo ghrá (Iss too mu graw) “You are my love” is as close as we come to saying “I love you” and is a lovely phrase that would work well as a thoughtful engraving
  • Mo fhíorghrá (moh hear-graw) – my true love

The Irish language has some wonderfully lyrical expressions for telling that particular someone how much you care about them! We have a huge selection of Anam Cara Rings, Mo Anam Cara Pendant or Mo Anam Cara Jewelry including our Gra Pendant.

Celtic Holidays, Celtic Jewelry, Claddagh Rings, Irish Jewelry, St. Valentine's Day

5 Meaningful Celtic Jewelry Gifts for Valentine’s Day

Portrait of girl holding red paper heart isolated on white background

Valentine’s Day is almost here! Not sure what to get that special someone in your life? Or maybe you just want to spoil yourself?

Or perhaps you’re wondering what to get for Valentine’s Day last-minute? We’ve put together a list of some pretty cool gifts for him and her to inspire you!

If you want to go all out for Valentine’s Day, consider mixing one of our Celtic jewelry gifts with an experience or special memory.

For instance giving our Heart of Connemara Pendant as a reminder of your fabulous romantic trip to Ireland a great example.


With a bouquet of roses, spice it up and give them to her with our Wild Irish Rose Earrings.


On Valentine’s Day, give her this Celtic Heartbeat Necklace and tell her she makes your heart skip a beat. Extra points for creativity we promise!

Now if these creative and romantic ideas don’t work for you this Valentine’s Day you can always take a more traditional Celtic jewelry approach to Valentine’s Day gift giving.

Nothing says I love you on Valentine’s Day like a Celtic Love Knot also known as a Trinity Knot. We have a huge selection of Trinity Knot necklaces but our Diamond Trinity Knot Necklace is perfect for that special someone.

Now if none of these beautiful pieces of Celtic jewelry do the trick to convey your enduring love to your Valentine then there is always the home run piece of Celtic jewelry, the Claddagh ring. Now the claddagh ring is a time honored tradition of promising ones eternal friendship, love and loyalty. Shop our huge selection of Claddagh Rings available in a variety of claddagh designs to meet any budget needs.

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Celtic Holidays, Celtic Jewelry, Claddagh Rings, Irish Christmas, Irish Jewelry

Friendship, Love & Loyalty – A Claddagh Gift Guide

The countdown to Christmas morning has begun! We’ve been getting a lot of inquiries about Claddagh Jewelry exclusively designed in our studio. For your convenience, I’ve compiled a quick and concise Claddagh gift guide of our most popular Claddagh Designs to make your shopping experience as stress-free as possible.

The Claddagh, with its magnificent symbolism and distinctively Irish design, is consistently at the top of our list of the most popular Irish jewelry designs we sell. Giving a stunning piece of Claddagh Jewelry from The Irish Jewelry Company is not difficult; the only difficult part is limiting it down to just one item!

When in doubt, though, we generally advise our customers to keep things simple keeping the recipient in mind and staying with their personal style.

Whether it’s a last-minute gift-giving option, or something on their list they have hinted about we’ve got a wide selection of Claddagh styles that’s sure to satisfy every loved one on your Christmas shopping list. Check out the styles below that have proven to be popular throughout the years, as well as a few of new ones, all of which are excellent for gifting this holiday season.

A Claddagh Ring for that Special Someone

In Irish culture, the Claddagh ring is considered to be a proud cultural symbol.
An incredible amount of people, Irish and non Irish all over the world wear or have been given a Claddagh ring by a close friend or family member to commemorate a variety of important occasions including romantic ones. This Irish vow of Love, Loyalty, and Friendship is perfect Christmas or for any occasion, whether it’s a wedding, an engagement, a birthday, or just because.

We have a large selection of Claddagh Rings for him and for her. Our collection of Claddagh Rings for men is wide – ranging. These stunning and sturdy Silver Claddagh Rings are among our best-selling items each year, and he will be impressed when he opens the box.

Choosing the right Claddagh Necklace Design

Maybe a Claddagh Pendant would be an excellent holiday present for them this year.
Claddagh Pendants are usually a popular option since there is a style to fit everyone’s taste in our collection. Our Claddagh Necklaces are inspired by Ireland and are masterfully created by our team of artisans. Owning a Sterling Silver Claddagh Necklace allows anyone to carry a bit of Ireland near to their hearts, and it is a favorite holiday gift choice for many people. We have a huge variety of Claddagh Necklace designs, like our Mother Claddagh Necklace and our Family Birthstone Claddagh Necklace, are available for purchase, making them ideal gifts for any mother or grandmother. When it comes to individuals who want a more trendy design that incorporates a variety of metals, our assortment of Silver and Gold Claddagh Pendants, such as our Claddagh Love Lock, or our Celtic Couples Claddagh Pendant will go with any outfit you choose.

Claddagh Earrings are Perfect for Anyone

A pair of our Claddagh Earrings will be a treasured addition to the jewelry collection of anybody who enjoys accessorizing with beautiful jewelry. Claddagh Earrings come in a variety of styles such as Claddagh Studs and Claddagh Dangle Earrings in a variety of Claddagh Earring Designs similar to our Claddagh Necklaces. Often our Silver Claddagh Necklaces have matching Silver Claddagh Earrings.