Irish Traditions

Celtic Dragonfly Pendant

Our Celtic Dragonfly Pendant is a totem that channels the wisdom of metamorphosis and adaptability in life.

The dragonfly symbolizes change in self realization, emotional maturity and the K6044 celtic dragon fly pendant 062261 - 79understanding of the deeper meaning of life.

 

  • Celtic Dragonfly Pendant is sterling silver with rhodium.
  • It has a 7×5 oval bezel set cz amethyst.
  • It measures approximately 33mm.
  • Comes on an 18 in silver chain.

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This design and its images are copyrighted © by The Irish Jewelry Company™

Halloween, Interesting Stories, Irish Traditions

IRISH HALLOWEEN TRADITION – BARMBRACK

There are many Irish Halloween traditions in Ireland. One of my favorites is barmbrack.
Barmbrack is at the very core of the Irish Halloween traditions. The Halloween Brack, much like Christmas pudding traditionally contained various objects baked into the sweet bread. These various items were used as fortune-telling. In the barmbrack items like a pea, a stick, a piece of cloth, a small coin (originally a silver sixpence) and a ring were traditionally used. When an item is received in the slice, had a meaning for that person. For instance if you got the pea, the person would not marry that year, the stick, you’ll have an unhappy marriage , the cloth or rag meant bad luck or you’ll be poor; the coin of course meant you’ll have good fortune or be rich and the ring, meant you would be wed within the year. Other items also added to the brack were medals, usually of the Virgin Mary to symbolize going into the priesthood or becoming a nun, although this tradition isn’t very popular today.

Recipe
INGREDIENTS

1 teaspoon dry active yeast
⅔ cup/158 milliliters lightly warmed milk
1 egg, beaten
1 ⅔ cups/214 grams all-purpose flour, plus flour for dusting
¼ teaspoon cinnamon 12002851_1068039236547381_8260594681565605031_n
¼ teaspoon clove
¼ teaspoon mace ( Mace is made from the lacy, red outer coating that covers the shell around the nutmeg kernel. )
½ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons/28 grams unsalted butter, softened, more for greasing pan
¼ cup/50 grams granulated sugar
½ cup/75 grams golden raisins
½ cup/75 grams black raisins
½ cup/75 grams currants
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
1 teaspoon grated orange zest

In a small bowl, whisk the yeast and milk together. Leave it to bubble slowly in a warm spot 10 minutes, then whisk in the beaten egg.
In a large mixing bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, put the flour, cinnamon, clove, mace, salt, butter and sugar. Mix well, incorporating butter with fingertips (or paddle, if using mixer) until absorbed.
Pour the yeast-milk-egg mixture into the flour mixture and stir with a wooden spoon (or dough hook, with mixer).
When the dough begins to come together, add the raisins, currants, lemon zest and orange zest, then mix to combine. It will be somewhat sticky dough. Dust lightly with flour, turn out onto a floured surface and knead for a few minutes until the dough feels smooth. Pat dough into a rectangle.
Butter a loaf pan and lay in the dough, pushing down so dough covers bottom of pan. Stretch plastic wrap loosely over pan and put in a warm place, covered with a kitchen towel, for about an hour, until doubled in size. Uncover.
Heat oven to 350 degrees and center a rack in the oven. Bake loaf on the centered rack for 45 minutes, until well browned. Carefully tip the loaf out of the pan onto a cooling rack. To tell whether it’s done, thump the bottom of the loaf with your fingertips; it should sound hollow. Let cool to room temperature before slicing, if possible. ( NYT recipe)

 

Happy Halloween!

To wish someone a happy Halloween, you can say:

Oíche Shamhna Shona Duit (EE-hyeh HOW-nuh HUN-uh ditch*)

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Irish Traditions

The Story of the Irish Claddagh Ring

Irish or not, if you want to give a token of your friendship, love and loyalty that has meaning, the Claddagh ring may be the choice for you. The Claddagh ring (Irish: fáinne Chladaigh) is a traditional Irish ring. The Claddagh ring means eternal love, loyalty, and friendship. The Claddagh ring consists of a heart with a crown held by two hands symbolizing love, loyalty and friendship. The Claddagh Ring has become a world renowned symbol of love.

Shop Claddaghs at TheIrishJewelryCompany.com

Irish Traditions

Irish Proverbs

Oh the infamous and ever popular Irish proverb. But what  is an Irish proverb exactly? Well in short an Irish proverb is a short saying that offers advice or gives wisdom. It is often in the form of a metaphor where human behavior is compared to the behavior of an animal or a natural item, like a tree or the wind.

Here are a few of our favorite Irish proverbs. we just love these truthful short and pithy Irish sayings.

Traditional Irish Proverbs:

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Irish Proverb Affirmation Bracelets available at The Irish Jewelry Company. https://www.theirishjewelrycompany.com/irish-proverb-affirmation-bracelets.html
  • If you don’t know the way walk slowly – Irish Proverb
  • Two thirds of help is to give courage – Irish Proverb
  • The best horse doesn’t always win the race – Irish Proverb
  • It takes time to build castles – Irish Proverb
  • No man is wise at all times – Irish Proverb
  • It’s easy to half the potato where there is love – Irish Proverb
  • Fierceness is often hidden under beauty – Irish Proverb
  • May hinges of our friendship never go rusty – Irish Proverb
  • If God shuts one door he opens another – Irish Proverb
  • Idleness is the desire of a fool – Irish Proverb
  • Wisdom exceeds strength – Irish Proverb
  • Patience can conquer destiny – Irish Proverb

A great way to show your love of these fabulous pithy snippets of wit it to wear an Irish proverb affirmation bracelet.

Live the Celtic life you have created. Live the life you love, inspire the relationships and friendships that you cherish. Do what you are passionate about and practice what you preach. The life of the Irish is to be enjoyed, not endured. And these truthful short and pithy Irish sayings are the proof.

So, follow your Celtic spirit and dreams, be open to new beginnings, and live life the way you love.

These bracelets fit very nicely together or separate to add a sense of purpose and truth to your ensemble. Stacked or solo, these bracelets ensure seamless Celtic style.

irish proverb affirmatiob banner.jpg

 

Celtic Holidays, Celtic Legends, Irish Traditions

The Feast of Saint Brigid

Ireland’s very own patron saint St. Brigid’s Feast Day is February 1st also as Imbolc.  Imbolc or Imbolg, is a Gaelic festival that traditional marks the start of warmer days and the arrival of spring.  It also the halfway point between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. Saint Brigid of Kildare is Ireland’s most important female saints. Saint Brigid was born Brigit, and shares her name with a Celtic goddess from whom many legends and folk customs are associated.

saint brigid banner new site banner

 

Celtic Legends, Halloween, Irish Traditions

The Origins of Halloween Costumes

On Halloween night children would dress up in scary costumes and go house to house. ‘Help the Halloween Party’ and ‘Trick or Treat’ were the cries to be heard at each door.

This tradition of wearing costumes also dates back to Celtic times. On the special night when the living and the dead were at their closest the Celtic Druids would dress up in elaborate costumehalloween kidss to disguise themselves as spirits and devils in case they encountered other devils and spirits during the night. By disguising they hoped that they would be able to avoid being carried away at the end of the night. This explains why witches, goblins and ghosts remain the most popular choices for the costumes.

Celtic Legends, Halloween, Irish Traditions

The Dullahan, the Irish Headless Horseman

Have you ever heard about “The Dullahan”, the Irish Headless Horseman?

The Irish legend of the Dullahan, or English translation “dark man” is unnerving. The AdobeStock_56147609.jpegHeadless Horseman or Dullahan is the Irish foreteller of death. The Dullahan rides a jet black horse with flames shooting from its eyes, carrying his head under one arm. Irish folklore says that when he stops riding, a human dies.
There are many versions of this scary tale. Some say that the Dullahan throws buckets of blood at people he passes, while other say he simply calls out the name of the mortal that will soon die.


But as with most evil entities the Dullahan has a weakness. The Dullahan can not stand the sight of GOLD. So you would be wise when traveling on this Halloween to carry a wee bit of in case you have a run-in with this headless horror!
Irish Traditions

The Banshee and Irish Halloween Folklore

A banshee ( BAN-shee; Modern Irish bean sí, from Old Irish: ban síde, “woman of the fairy mound” or “fairy woman”) is a female spirit in Irish mythology who heralds the death of a family member, usually by shrieking or keening. Her name is connected to the mythologically important tumuli or “mounds” that dot the Irish countryside, which are known as síde (singular síd) in Old Irish.
The Banshee, bean-sidhe (woman of the fairy may be an ancestral spirit appointed to Banshee. Fantasy style portrait of a howling womanforewarn members of certain ancient Irish families of their time of death. According to tradition, the banshee can only cry for five major Irish families: the O’Neills, the O’Briens, the O’Connors, the O’Gradys and the Kavanaghs. Intermarriage has since extended this select list.
Whatever her origins, the banshee chiefly appears in one of three guises: a young woman, a stately matron or a raddled old hag. These represent the triple aspects of the Celtic goddess of war and death, namely Badhbh, Macha and Mor-Rioghain.) She usually wears either a grey, hooded cloak or the winding sheet or grave robe of the unshriven dead. She may also appear as a washer-woman, and is seen apparently washing the blood stained clothes of those who are about to die. In this guise she is known as the bean-nighe (washing woman).

Although not always seen, her mourning call is heard, usually at night when someone is about to die.
Folklore - Banshees. Date: 1862
Bunworth Banshee, “Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland”, by Thomas Crofton Croker, 1825
Celtic Holidays, Celtic Legends, Halloween, Interesting Stories, Irish Traditions

The Pooka In Irish Folklore

The púca (Irish for spirit/ghost), pooka, phouka, phooka, phooca, puca or púka is primarily a creature of Celtic folklore. Considered to be bringers both of good and bad fortune, they could either help or hinder rural and marine communities.The Púca can have dark or staunch white fur or hair. The creatures were said to be shape changers which could take the appearance of horses, goats, cats, dogs, and hares. They may also take a human form, which includes various animal features, such as ears or a tail.

The Phooka
Faeries by Brian Froud and Alan Lee