Irish Traditions

About The Irish Poet W.B. Yeats and His Poems

William Butler Yeats, who was born on June 13, 1865, is often regarded as one of the most accomplished poets to come from Ireland. His poetry is deeply ingrained in the national consciousness of Ireland. Some of his writings made reference to his unrequited love for Maud Gonne, who is generally regarded as his muse. Ireland was also a favorite subject for him to write about. It is also generally known that he has a curiosity about supernatural occurrences. People have a tendency to see him as a somewhat sad person due to the fact that he wrote wonderful poetry about the experience of continuously proposing to a lady who continually rejected him. (And after that, he proposed to her grown daughter, who likewise rejected him.) However, Yeats is not just the most poetically talented spurned suitor in the history of Ireland. He is also much more.

Which of William Butler Yeats’s works is considered to be his most well-known?

Yeats was just 21 years old when he wrote The Stolen Child in the year 1886. It is the most well-known poem from his very first book of poetry, which was published under the title The Wanderings of Oisin and Other Poems. It is also considered to be one of his most significant early works. Yeats had a significant interest in Irish mythology, and the poem that he wrote was inspired by Irish folklore.

What are the reasons why William Butler Yeats was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize?

William Butler Yeats was given the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923 for his constantly inspiring poetry, which is a highly aesthetic form that gives expression to the soul of an entire people. This was the reason for the award.

How would you describe the writing of W.B. Yeats?

Yeats’ work was a shift from Romanticism to Modernism as an Artistic Movement. Yeats began his extensive creative career as a romantic poet, and during the course of his career, he progressively transitioned into a modernist poet. When he first started publishing his poetry in the 1880s, his poems had a lyrical and romantic tone, and the subject matter of his poems centered on love, yearning, and loss, as well as Irish mythology.

The Irish poet William Butler Yeats is largely regarded as one of the most significant literary figures of the 20th century.

Yeats’ Most Famous Poem, The Stolen Child

The Stolen Child is a ballad poem that tells a narrative. it consists of four stanzas and 53 lines, there are two types of rhyme schemes here.

The Stolen Child

Where dips the rocky highland
Of Sleuth Wood in the lake,
There lies a leafy island
Where flapping herons wake
The drowsy water rats;
There we’ve hid our faery vats,
Full of berrys
And of reddest stolen cherries.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world’s more full of weeping than you can understand.

Where the wave of moonlight glosses
The dim gray sands with light,
Far off by furthest Rosses
We foot it all the night,
Weaving olden dances
Mingling hands and mingling glances
Till the moon has taken flight;
To and fro we leap
And chase the frothy bubbles,
While the world is full of troubles
And anxious in its sleep.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world’s more full of weeping than you can understand.

Where the wandering water gushes
From the hills above Glen-Car,
In pools among the rushes
That scarce could bathe a star,
We seek for slumbering trout
And whispering in their ears
Give them unquiet dreams;
Leaning softly out
From ferns that drop their tears
Over the young streams.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world’s more full of weeping than you can understand.

Away with us he’s going,
The solemn-eyed:
He’ll hear no more the lowing
Of the calves on the warm hillside
Or the kettle on the hob
Sing peace into his breast,
Or see the brown mice bob
Round and round the oatmeal chest.
For he comes, the human child,
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world’s more full of weeping than he can understand.

W. B. Yeats – 1865-1939